Business Communication

Added Value

Do you know the true value of your customers?

 

Customer numbers, revenues and retentions are in many ways the rocket fuels of business success. Certainly if you wish to impress bankers, investors and the market in general with corporate growth under your leadership and management you had better understand and pay homage to this important trilogy.

Do you know the true value of your customers?

What is the key metric you use to measure and drive your business?

When asking this question I find that most answer with “EBIT”, “margins”, “revenues”, ROI or some other fairly common KPI, however, I believe “Customer Lifetime Value” (LTCV) is perhaps the most significant measure to indicate the general health, sustainability and true value of a business. It is one of the most overlooked and least understood KPI’s or metrics in business, and yet it is one of the easiest to quantify.

Why is this particular metric so important? Because truly understanding it will deliver rewards, it will give you an accurate indication of how much repeat business you can expect from a particular customer, which in turn enables you to accurately forecast, cost and develop your business.

The value of LTCV in determining marketing spend and direction is immeasurable as it will not only help you to decide how much you can afford to spend to “buy” each new customer for your business, it will also motivate you to grow your business by showing you when and when to spend.

Once you understand how frequently a customer buys, how much they spend and for how long you retain them you will better understand how to allocate your resources to optimize customer growth and retention programs.

An easy calculation to estimate CLTV is to insert actual or estimated (if you’re in the planning stages or just starting out) numbers into the following equation:

(Average Value of a Sale) X (Number of Repeat Transactions) X (Average Retention Time in Months or Years for a Typical Customer)

A simple example would be the calculation of a service subscriber who spends $20 every month on a 3 year average retention. The CLTV would be:

$20 X 12 months X 3 years = $720 LTCV

We can see from this hypothetical example why so many successful businesses offer a free or discounted service to attract new customers and grow their business. Savvy entrepreneurs know that as long as they spend less than (say) one year’s revenue of $240 to acquire a new customer, the customer will quickly prove profitable and add a further CLTV to the business.

Further refinements can be made by calculating the margin value of each customer and the cost/benefit of a stronger customer service and or retention program.

Once you can demonstrate the multiples of CLTV you place your business in a very strong position should you later require additional funds for expansion from banks and financiers or equity from investors

Growing your CLTV

Once you have some idea of the lifetime value of your customer, you have two Targeted Marketing options in deciding how much to spend to acquiring each new customer:

  1. Allowable acquisition cost: This is the maximum amount you’re willing to spend per customer per Targeted Marketing campaign – In this instance ensure the cost expended is less than the profit made on the first sale. This is an excellent short-term strategy for an emerging business or one in which cash flow is a concern.

  2. Calculated Investment acquisition cost: This is the calculated cost you expend per customer in Targeted Marketing where you know that you will take a loss on initial and occasionally subsequent sales as you have pre-determined that you have the available cash resources to fund your marketing investment. This is a longer-term strategy ideal for mid-life to mature businesses looking to consolidate growth patterns and market share.

Marketing: Expense or Investment?

This is an interesting question which all entrepreneurs should resolve very early in their careers. In my assessment marketing must always be an investment with a measurable ROI. Understanding the LTCV of your customers provides you with such an ROI, a metric easy to establish and measure.

You will struggle to develop an optimal marketing budget unless you know what the return on your investment needs to be. This knowledge is essential as it will lead you to make sound marketing decisions based on the reality of sound and supported metrics rather than the ethereal promises of a new media promotion or program.

Understanding your LTCV’s provides you with specific knowledge as to how, or if, you can discount or offer incentives to attract new business. It will help you avoid the potentially disastrous effects of discounting when your business needs cash flow to survive. In addition, you will find innovative ways to build value upfront and create offers that drive enough volume to support and eventually increase your overall LTCV.

Think this through and take some time to calculate the LTCV equation as it applies to your business no matter if you are established, growing or just starting out. This is the metric for everyone.

In summary, the LTCV will determine the planning and frequency of your marketing spend, the ultimate success and thus the ultimate value of your business.

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By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://www.neilsteggall.org/?p=1216

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Strength Through Diversity & Change

Diversity and Change are catalysts to growth and development, to new ideas and to improvement throughout the world in which we live. Darwin’s evolution of the species demonstrated how through diversity and change the world is able to constantly evolve and improve.

Why then are so many of us suspicious of both diversity and change, why do we fight to protect the status quo? Is it as simple as a fear of the unknown? It brings to mind Franklin D Roosevelt’s famous speech “….the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself”

If we are to get the best outcome from any human endeavour we require continuing diversity and change at all levels. Diversity of age, experience, education, gender, race, outlook and expectation, imagine a team encompassing such diversity tackling the big and complex issues within your business. Can you envision the team’s potency and its potential to drive change?

Increasingly business is global, multi-cultural and can no longer assume the gender of decision makers on either buy or sell side transactions. Successful teams and organisations need to reflect this diversity and change to embrace it.

Managing change requires both vision and courage but the rewards are enormous, when we think of Apple today we think of iPhone’s and iPad’s first and computers second. This reflects their ability and capacity to change and yet it still overlooks their leading edge position as a global leader in integrated retailing.

The days of proud “national manufacturers” are a fading memory as global organisations position differing operations in the global location most suited. R&D may take place in California, IP is held in Ireland, manufacturing close to the source of labour or raw materials. Management and staff are drawn from universities and institutions from all points of the globe and across many faculties.

A modern corporate board is just as likely to include a female graduate in PP&E as a male holding an MBA. Shareholders are increasingly focused on “whole of business” concept as opposed to the out dated “short term profit” position. The CBA board must now be wishing it could wind back the clock a few years to avoid its current publicity.

Change isn’t always good, some mistakes will always be made but hand in hand with diversity we are now more open to the faster assessment of ideas and their success or failure and prepared to act quickly to recognise mistakes, clear them out and move forward.

Don’t just accept diversity and change, embrace them, use them and remember:-

“….the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself” – Franklin D Roosevelt    

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-ji

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 Communication Drives SUCCESS!

Communication is the #1 single skill needed at every level of business from a one man SME to multi-national corporations. To gain the most out of our lives we need great communication skills and yet I find a great deal of confusion as to what constitutes good communication.

I have written in the past about the importance of SMILES; perhaps the earliest and most basic form of human communication. Communication can be simple good manners. On a recent weekend enjoying the spring sun over an outdoor breakfast my wife and I smiled and nodded at the couple on an adjacent table to us. A simple communication opener which was just as simply reciprocated. The real communication occurred later when my wife asked questions of our new table neighbours …”and what do you do?”

Suddenly not only did their fascinating lives come alive but so did an exciting potential joint project between them and my wife.

Now remember we were just relaxing, careful not to intrude, enjoying Sunday breakfast but we understand communication is human and we are open to communicating. People sense this.

Communication is not what we say; it is who we are and what we do, that creates the impression, or as was said in the Australian movie, The Castle…..”It’s the Vibe”.

A US expert and communication authority Dr John Lund uses an interesting quote; “Don`t communicate to be understood; rather, communicate so as not to be misunderstood.” What a great way to put things in perspective regarding our efforts on how to improve our communication.

Dr Lund has explored the way in which we interpret communication from others.  He also reveals some very interesting statistics on communication.

When someone is speaking with us, we interpret their message based predominantly on the following three factors:

•55% is based on their facial expressions and their body language.

•37% is based on the tone of their voice.

•8% is based on the words they say.

Dr Lund states that his findings are the average taken across both males and females collectively, but that if you looked at women alone they would even give greater weight to the facial expression and body language and even less on the words.

This tells us that it is critical that we become very self-aware of how our body language is speaking to others as well as the tone we use.

Read my article on smiles! That smile comes through in your tone of voice over the phone. It works wonders on how well you come off on a phone call, trust me!

Smile: Shortlink:  http://wp.me/p401Wv-4x

Early in my career I worked for a hugely intelligent man who used to very gently ask me questions after a meeting. He would listen patiently to my answers and say “Neil listen to what they mean and what they need, not what they say”. At first this confounded me until I slowly realised that it may on occasion be difficult, embarrassing or even offending to state what you mean or need.

Once I learned to look beneath the surface, communication and business became easier, more productive and far more enjoyable.

The next major change in my thinking was when I realised that 10 different people see the same thing in 10 slightly different ways. And importantly women see things as differently again from a man which is why mixed sex teams work so well in obtaining balance.

To get your thinking moving look at the graphic below and tell me how many squares you can see?

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I will leave the answer for the end of the article but in warning I will let you know that in a recent study 96% of Telstra management got this wrong!

Getting back on theme, in the study men occasionally and women mostly want to know three things before they are willing to enter into a business conversation with you:

1.  Is what you want to talk about going to be painful?

2.  How long is it going to take?

3.  When you are done talking, what do you want from me?

If they don’t know these three things up front, they will make excuses to avoid your call or to avoid talking to you on the phone.  The same applies if you come into contact with them in person.

It’s fair to assume that your manager or client in a work setting will always want to know those three things in advance of agreeing to a conversation as well.

It comes down to an ingrained human need to want a strategic exit from difficulty.

These are acquired skills which roll easily off the tongue of experience; however this terrified me early in my career. If in doubt as to what to say or do remember that a show of genuine respect will always help in establishing a rapport, if you are terrified say so, the person you are communicating with will respond positively.

How to successfully conduct a conversation in business:

Success in business is greatly impacted for better or worse by the way in which we communicate. Happiness in our personal lives is also greatly dependent on this very same skill. If you don’t believe me just look at any married couple and work it out!  Becoming a good communicator takes practice and consistent attention and effort on our part, and it is a skill that we cannot afford to overlook.

Remember “don`t communicate to be understood; rather, communicate so as not to be misunderstood.” And always, always allow room for respect.

Now as to the “squares” there are 9 individual small squares; 5 2×2 squares; 1 4×4 square and one 3×3 square. A total of 16.

I hope you worked it out. Whatever your answer think on what it means about how we see and communicate ideas.

By; Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-ag

www.wardourcapital.com

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