Neil Steggall

Integrity in Leadership - WCP 2014

Showing Integrity, Leadership and Respect.

Leadership goes hand in hand with Trust and Respect and to build a reputation for Trust and Respect you need to demonstrate a high level of Integrity, however, integrity can be a contradiction in today’s workplace.

The label of integrity is hard to earn and yet it can be lost in a single action. It is not something we consciously look for in someone but we tend to notice when it is missing.

Once we regularly consider our own actions and evaluate how they align with our personal values, intentions, and deeds, we recognise the changes we need to make and thus we start to make a contribution to the world of integrity.

We are each responsible for our own integrity and the best leaders create cultures that nourish the integrity of others.

At its root of the word integrity we find; to “integer” and “integrate”, it speaks of unity and wholeness. We still think of the word in this original sense when we talk about “structural integrity,” the quality that enables a building to stand and that which, when lost, lets a building collapse under its own weight.

As US Rabbi Jonathan Omer-Man said, “Integrity is the ability to listen to the place inside oneself that doesn’t change, even though the life that carries it may change.”

Most of us evolve and develop throughout our journey as leaders. Our character and our integrity are remembered long after the glitter of the deals has faded.

Having integrity leads to the building of trust as we practice honest conversations with others. Integrity is a positive deposit in the bank of our connections.

Trust is an inherent part of integrity. People need to trust that leadership is serving everyone’s best interest and leadership needs to trust that team members are fulfilling their own responsibilities.

HOW DO WE IMPROVE LEADERSHIP INTEGRITY?

“The strength of a nation derives from the integrity of the home.” Confucius

This possibly varies person to person but the following points, in my opinion, cover integrity within leadership.

Respect – practice integrity with others by treating them with respect — even when they do not live up to your personal expectations of them. Recognise that your own standards can be subject to question. We get and give the best of each other in a culture that supports respect.

Reliability – This is a more functional definition of integrity and a basic practice of a natural leader. It includes showing a little humility, keeping promises, meeting important deadlines and being there when people need you.

Sharing – It’s important for leaders to clearly articulate their values and expectation of integrity. Share these values as a culture-building objective as to how we collectively define integrity.

Responsibility – We need to acknowledge our responsibility for every one of our actions. It demonstrates that we are not using other people or external events as the cause of our problems. Wherever possible blame no one, accept the behaviour of others and the circumstances of an action as a given, and move forward.

Considered Actions – This is the leader’s obligation to take the right action. It means embodying our integral principles and accepting the consequences for our actions.

Thinking 360° – Think of the whole not just this one problem or decision, integrity can be viewed as a culture of wholeness, of being able to support all of the components for the long term good of all.

I have to admit that I have on numerous occasions made decisions or taken a course of action that would not withstand scrutiny of the points above. This is where self-awareness comes in and that question; “What is the correct course?” and remember life is a journey, good and bad……we can only do our best as we see it at the time!

Corporate responsibility and integrity make strange if not incompatible bed fellows and over the years have formed much discussion over the dinner table. In this article I am really only trying to examine questions of integrity in leadership.

Examining integrity at an intellectual level seems to raise more questions than answers. Mistakes will always made and occasionally poor judgement will be shown. Importantly we are now aware of some of the questions and it’s what we learn and how we adapt to our mistakes that we should now contemplate.

“The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-jp

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Added Value

Do you know the true value of your customers?

 

Customer numbers, revenues and retentions are in many ways the rocket fuels of business success. Certainly if you wish to impress bankers, investors and the market in general with corporate growth under your leadership and management you had better understand and pay homage to this important trilogy.

Do you know the true value of your customers?

What is the key metric you use to measure and drive your business?

When asking this question I find that most answer with “EBIT”, “margins”, “revenues”, ROI or some other fairly common KPI, however, I believe “Customer Lifetime Value” (LTCV) is perhaps the most significant measure to indicate the general health, sustainability and true value of a business. It is one of the most overlooked and least understood KPI’s or metrics in business, and yet it is one of the easiest to quantify.

Why is this particular metric so important? Because truly understanding it will deliver rewards, it will give you an accurate indication of how much repeat business you can expect from a particular customer, which in turn enables you to accurately forecast, cost and develop your business.

The value of LTCV in determining marketing spend and direction is immeasurable as it will not only help you to decide how much you can afford to spend to “buy” each new customer for your business, it will also motivate you to grow your business by showing you when and when to spend.

Once you understand how frequently a customer buys, how much they spend and for how long you retain them you will better understand how to allocate your resources to optimize customer growth and retention programs.

An easy calculation to estimate CLTV is to insert actual or estimated (if you’re in the planning stages or just starting out) numbers into the following equation:

(Average Value of a Sale) X (Number of Repeat Transactions) X (Average Retention Time in Months or Years for a Typical Customer)

A simple example would be the calculation of a service subscriber who spends $20 every month on a 3 year average retention. The CLTV would be:

$20 X 12 months X 3 years = $720 LTCV

We can see from this hypothetical example why so many successful businesses offer a free or discounted service to attract new customers and grow their business. Savvy entrepreneurs know that as long as they spend less than (say) one year’s revenue of $240 to acquire a new customer, the customer will quickly prove profitable and add a further CLTV to the business.

Further refinements can be made by calculating the margin value of each customer and the cost/benefit of a stronger customer service and or retention program.

Once you can demonstrate the multiples of CLTV you place your business in a very strong position should you later require additional funds for expansion from banks and financiers or equity from investors

Growing your CLTV

Once you have some idea of the lifetime value of your customer, you have two Targeted Marketing options in deciding how much to spend to acquiring each new customer:

  1. Allowable acquisition cost: This is the maximum amount you’re willing to spend per customer per Targeted Marketing campaign – In this instance ensure the cost expended is less than the profit made on the first sale. This is an excellent short-term strategy for an emerging business or one in which cash flow is a concern.

  2. Calculated Investment acquisition cost: This is the calculated cost you expend per customer in Targeted Marketing where you know that you will take a loss on initial and occasionally subsequent sales as you have pre-determined that you have the available cash resources to fund your marketing investment. This is a longer-term strategy ideal for mid-life to mature businesses looking to consolidate growth patterns and market share.

Marketing: Expense or Investment?

This is an interesting question which all entrepreneurs should resolve very early in their careers. In my assessment marketing must always be an investment with a measurable ROI. Understanding the LTCV of your customers provides you with such an ROI, a metric easy to establish and measure.

You will struggle to develop an optimal marketing budget unless you know what the return on your investment needs to be. This knowledge is essential as it will lead you to make sound marketing decisions based on the reality of sound and supported metrics rather than the ethereal promises of a new media promotion or program.

Understanding your LTCV’s provides you with specific knowledge as to how, or if, you can discount or offer incentives to attract new business. It will help you avoid the potentially disastrous effects of discounting when your business needs cash flow to survive. In addition, you will find innovative ways to build value upfront and create offers that drive enough volume to support and eventually increase your overall LTCV.

Think this through and take some time to calculate the LTCV equation as it applies to your business no matter if you are established, growing or just starting out. This is the metric for everyone.

In summary, the LTCV will determine the planning and frequency of your marketing spend, the ultimate success and thus the ultimate value of your business.

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By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://www.neilsteggall.org/?p=1216

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Transition - WCP 2014

Strength Through Diversity & Change

Diversity and Change are catalysts to growth and development, to new ideas and to improvement throughout the world in which we live. Darwin’s evolution of the species demonstrated how through diversity and change the world is able to constantly evolve and improve.

Why then are so many of us suspicious of both diversity and change, why do we fight to protect the status quo? Is it as simple as a fear of the unknown? It brings to mind Franklin D Roosevelt’s famous speech “….the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself”

If we are to get the best outcome from any human endeavour we require continuing diversity and change at all levels. Diversity of age, experience, education, gender, race, outlook and expectation, imagine a team encompassing such diversity tackling the big and complex issues within your business. Can you envision the team’s potency and its potential to drive change?

Increasingly business is global, multi-cultural and can no longer assume the gender of decision makers on either buy or sell side transactions. Successful teams and organisations need to reflect this diversity and change to embrace it.

Managing change requires both vision and courage but the rewards are enormous, when we think of Apple today we think of iPhone’s and iPad’s first and computers second. This reflects their ability and capacity to change and yet it still overlooks their leading edge position as a global leader in integrated retailing.

The days of proud “national manufacturers” are a fading memory as global organisations position differing operations in the global location most suited. R&D may take place in California, IP is held in Ireland, manufacturing close to the source of labour or raw materials. Management and staff are drawn from universities and institutions from all points of the globe and across many faculties.

A modern corporate board is just as likely to include a female graduate in PP&E as a male holding an MBA. Shareholders are increasingly focused on “whole of business” concept as opposed to the out dated “short term profit” position. The CBA board must now be wishing it could wind back the clock a few years to avoid its current publicity.

Change isn’t always good, some mistakes will always be made but hand in hand with diversity we are now more open to the faster assessment of ideas and their success or failure and prepared to act quickly to recognise mistakes, clear them out and move forward.

Don’t just accept diversity and change, embrace them, use them and remember:-

“….the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself” – Franklin D Roosevelt    

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-ji

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Win-Win WCP 2014

 

How To Become A Great Negotiator

Most of our successful leaders and entrepreneurs are great negotiators. The skill of negotiation is recognised as one of the important ingredients of success and yet so few of us truly understand what it is that makes a great negotiator.

It is often said that children are great negotiators; they are persistent and return to their objective time and time again, attempting differing angles to win their parents around. From here it often goes wrong as well-meaning parents impose rules and suggest that this constant negotiation is both bad manners and plain naughty!

Recovering from childhood scaring we recognise that negotiations are a fact of life, we are constantly negotiating in both our personal and professional lives.

Those that are not strong negotiators tend to fall into one of two camps: the first dislike or avoid negotiating and this can lead to problems in resolving issues or progressing their careers, the second see the first rule of negotiating as the need to “win”.

Both attitudes are problematic the first is both self-defeating and confusing to others and the second is always going to leave behind a bruised “loser” – neither is a good outcome.

There are THREE key steps essential to becoming a great negotiator:

Applying these three negotiation processes will significantly increase the impact and success of your future negotiations.

1.0 NEGOTIATING ATTITUDE

What you bring to the table in terms of your attitude and approach will have a significant bearing on the outcome, you should always:

Show Respect & Trust

See the other team or person as an equal and treat them with the courtesy and respect you would expect, it’s surprising how this opens real discussion.

Listen to what isn’t said

Look carefully at what the other side is really saying, this will tell you what they really want.

Remain Flexible

Successful negotiators view each key point from multiple perspectives; they are flexible in which points to concede to achieve the end game. Be prepared and willing to change.

Target Continuity

Always view the other team as a valuable, respected and long term contact. Armed with this attitude you will never be tempted to “rip off” the other team.

Win-Win Outcomes

This is the ultimate outcome in any negotiation; it will leave all parties satisfied and lead to productive, successful long term relationships. Sound groundwork, an open mind and a fair approach will find more win-wins than you would at first imagine.

2.0 THE NEGOTIATION

A successful negotiation is usually based upon 3 distinct stages: Preparation, Negotiation and Documentation. Each stage is of equal importance; a great negotiator knows this and allows for it when planning.

Preparation

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” (Benjamin Franklin).

The key to preparation is to place yourself mentally into the other party’s position. Assess where they are at within the negotiation, what they want, what they need and what they can live with. Understand their motivation, perspective and opinions on the topic. What are the minimum conditions they can accept and at what point are they likely “to walk away”.

Define your own goals and objectives, analyse what you must have, what you can concede and where your fall-back position is. Develop several potential options; identify your best possible outcome and your least attractive “fall back” position.

Search for “win-win” solutions

Negotiating

Be relaxed, respectful and most importantly be prepared to really hear what is being said and retain an open mind.

Listen rather than speak, silence is your friend. Search for common points of agreement rather than the differences; agree these early to develop trust and comfort.

After the initial discussion take the initiative and start the actual negotiation by tabling your offer. This initial offer forms a subconscious reference point, a middle ground if you like. If you are buying start low and if you are selling start high.

An excellent tactic is to make multiple offers each with different terms and conditions this demonstrates your flexibility whilst the other party’s response to the choices tells you much about what they really want or need.

Always show “Samurai Sympathy”; that is do not box the other party into a corner from which they cannot escape without a loss of face.

Once you have established the other parties bona fides and you are satisfied they want to reach a genuine solution don’t be afraid to be the first to concede points but do so in a “give and take” scenario. Know what you want to take. Focus on the end point rather than the current position. Being pro-active will build trust and goodwill.

Showing respect for the other party does not mean that you cannot show strength or participate in the theatre of negotiating. If unreasonable demands or proposals are put forward demonstrate your dissatisfaction, show your surprise and your disappointment strongly but do not allow any genuine anger or frustration to develop, remain calm and remain in control.

Don’t be in a hurry, abide by your timetable (especially when buying), confrontations will occur, board approval may need to be sought, lawyers consulted all of which are normal. A great negotiator allows for this, allows time for parties to cool off when discussion becomes overheated. If tension builds, ask if you and your team can have 10 minutes alone to discuss the situation, be pro-active, remain flexible and remember your objective.

In the closing stages of a negotiation the great negotiator seeks a creative solution, they look beyond the box, they expand the available options rather than fight the detail and they stand firm to their position. This is the time to bring everything you have learnt into play in the best win-win solution you can offer.

3.0 DOCUMENTATION

I have seen people leave a negotiation “pumped-up” by the result and ready to party only to find out a day or two later that the other party has had a “change of mind” and called the deal off.

After reaching agreement around the table it is best to re-iterate the key points of the agreement, hand write them have two copies made and each party sign them off. This isn’t a binding agreement but it is a moral statement.

Confirm the agreement in a written Heads of Agreement and get this document signed within 24 hours of the meeting. The HOA should cover any conditions precedent and a timeline to contracts.

Call the other party as soon as appropriate after the meeting to thank them for their time and professionalism, work with them and strengthen the bonds for the future.

Finally food for thought…………….

“Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate”

Unknown Quote        

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-jd

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Crash - WCP 2014

 “How important is profit?” this question in one form or another is one of the most common questions we receive from start-up owners or potential start-ups and surprisingly it’s not a simple answer.

Some time ago I sat down for a chat with a highly intelligent friend who had recently joined the board of a mid-sized family company. “I just don’t get it” she said “everyone tells me the business is booming, sales are up, profits are up yet from what I read the company is broke”.

My friend had sat down with the half year results and looked at the first two quarters performance against budget. Revenues were up by around 35%, Gross Margin was tracking, as a percentage, around 5% better than budget and operating expenses were around 11% lower than budget leaving a very healthy EBIT compared to budget and management applauding themselves all round.

Where is the problem? I hear you ask.

Cash or rather the lack of it was the problem. As revenues and revenue projections grew the funds allocated to the raw materials and finished goods needed to service such growth had increased exponentially as had the debtor’s ledger.

Yes the business was producing more at lower cost and selling every item produced at a profit but amongst the excitement no one had calculated the impact on future cash flows.

If you achieve an EBIT of 20% (which is on the generous side) it means you have to outlay costs, in advance, of at least $0.80c in every dollar of anticipated revenue. You may offset this to some extent by negotiating an extension to trading terms with your creditors but that is a very slippery slope and best avoided.

If you sell your product to a major retail chain, they will look to pay you in 60 days from the end of the month in which you invoice them. So you could easily wait 60 to 90 days for payment. For every $10 of widgets you sell them each month your cost is $8 and if you carry that and the subsequent monthly sales until you are paid, you are out of pocket by $24 before you receive a cent. On top of which you have had to lift your finished goods to 60 days stock to meet varying demand and raw materials by 45 days so you are roughly $50 out of pocket as you wait for the $10 to be paid of which you retain $2 profit or EBIT.

Yes you are still profitable but your short term cash burn is exceeding income and without a rethink your fast growing, profitable enterprise is going to crash.

“A profitable business without a cash flow is dead in all but name!”

My friend could see where the company was heading whilst the sales manager was elated by high revenues, the production manager proud of the COGS and the operations manager satisfied by the low level of OPEX. In all businesses good cash flow management and budgeting is essential.

There were several funding options available to secure this company’s future once the threat was identified. But within 60 days the company may have been in turmoil and no funder wants to lend into a panic.

So in answer to the question; profit is very important but it is just one of what I call “The Four Pillars of Business”: Revenue, Cost, Profit and Cash; and always remember that whilst the first three are very important CASH IS ALWAYS KING.

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-iL

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Positive Pricing WCP 2014

The Power of Positive Pricing!

And how to use positive pricing to double your profits $$$

 

When discussing management theory some subjects are greeted with much more enthusiasm than others and recently I addressed a group of SME owners on “Improving Profits” a subject dear to all and a topic pretty well guaranteed to ensure rapt audience attention irrespective of the speakers skill.

Yes profit was in everyone’s mind and the subject was greeted with enthusiasm, yet as I probed, few participants really understood what profit is, how it is calculated and what profit really means.

After some general discussion I threw open three questions:-

  1. Do you know what your profit was last year?

  2. Do you know how to define or calculate your profit?

  3. Do you want to double your profit next year?

Let’s leave question 3 aside for now as I reckon you can guess the answer. Disappointingly however, few participants could provide a clear and accurate answer to questions 1 & 2, so we spent some time discussing the calculation and meaning of Gross Profit, Operating Profit, EBIT and finally Net Profit.

We covered off a little basic accounting and financial theory before agreeing that for everyday use EBIT (earnings before interest and tax) was perhaps the most relevant and practical “measure of profit” and that most companies operate within a rough ratio of EBIT of to revenue of between 5% and 20%. SME’s tend to perform a little better (in my experience) at between 10% and 20% and so we chose 15% as our optimum target.

Obviously question 3 brought about an enthusiastic if predictable response…….everyone wanted to double their profit! The reasons for wanting to increase profit were many and varied spanning those who were currently unprofitable and struggling to those who saw profit as the ultimate measure of success – more on that later!

So given the enthusiasm for the subject the doubling of profit was discussed as a group and the group ideas noted. Those ideas or suggestions for improving profits emerged in roughly the following order of importance:-

a)      Reduce costs

b)      Lift sales

c)       Spend more on marketing

d)      Use social media to drive sales

e)      Improve/increase product range/service

f)       Buy better/lower costs (stock, raw materials, etc)

g)      Improve efficiencies/productivity

h)      Expand/take on more staff

We work-shopped these 8 ideas until we collectively agreed that lifting profits this way wasn’t as easy as it looked and so I asked a very simple question.

“What would happen if you increased your selling prices by 15%”?

The consensus was nothing much. It may lose some customers but by focusing on service standards and a strong customer contact and communication program customer loss could be minimised if not overcome altogether.

Let’s return to our earlier accounting theory and take the example of an SME with revenues (sales) of $500,000 pa.

After wages, costs and overheads, that hypothetical business will generate an EBIT, as discussed, of approximately 15% of revenues –so let’s say $75,000 per annum.

If we applied an across the board price increase of 15% the hypothetical business would generate additional revenues of $75,000 which if costs are stable (as they should be) w ould flow directly to EBIT thus doubling your profit.

If your selling price was lifted by only 5% then your revenues would be $525,000 and EBIT $100,000 giving you an increased profit of 33.33% and so on.

Surveys demonstrate three consistent failings in SME profits:_

         i.            A reluctance to charge what the job or service is really worth – remember your EBIT or PROFIT is only 15% of revenues the rest goes to cover wages and costs

       ii.            A willingness to discount by 10% or 15% when asked. This “wipes out” your profit – why give it?

      iii.            A failure to pass on cost increases as they occur. This means your profit is slowly eroding by at least CPI and possibly more.

The money you retain or take out of your business each week to feed your family and pay the household bills with isn’t profit. That is your wage.

Given the risk, stress, long hours and commitment you dedicate to building your SME you need to see a profit over and above your wages!

Your profit can be fine-tuned by attending to some of the points raised in a) to h) above but addressing your price points will give you the fastest and most efficient profit improvement.

Earlier I mentioned that some SME owners see profit as the ultimate measure of success. Profit is perhaps better seen as the fuel that can be used to build your business through:-

  • Improved conditions and training for employees

  • Providing the highest possible and most up to date services to your customers.

  • Allowing access to quality advisor’s and advice

  • Employing and retaining the best people

These four points will lead to the achievement of sustainable profits and when you come to sell your business sustainable profits are very valuable indeed!

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SMS Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-dA

www.wardourcapital.com

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Great-Teams - Win - WCP 1014

Great Teams Win!

And Keep on Winning

We Aussies know all about teams.

We have the AFL the NRL, the Premier League, not to mention cricket, hockey, swimming, tennis, netball, bowls and of course the local drinking team.

Every one of us passionately follows a team or two so of course we know all about team work…..don’t we?

In management speak we come across the words team, teamwork, team building, team targets every day without giving a very much thought as to what a team really is and how it functions.

The most simplistic and common dictionary definition of a team is: “to come together to achieve a common goal”. Essentially the objective of teamwork is to achieve more than the sum total of the individual people involved.

Pretty simple hey? And yet recently I came across two comments which demonstrated to me that not everyone finds the team concept so simple.

The first comment was in the form of a question to a SME advice column in a major daily newspaper – “I recently started a small business with a partner and he doesn’t work as hard as me. How can I get him to lift his input?”

The second was a question asked during a seminar “As a team leader I find it very difficult getting everyone in a team to contribute equally; what do you recommend?”

In both instances my thought was that these guys just don’t understand team work!

Let’s return to the definition and to that “common goal”. The first thing a good team leader does is to define the “common goal” the individual tasks out and best match the team members to the task. A simple team check list can help such as:-

  • Very clearly and simply define the Common Goal

  • Determine the best strategies to achieve the Common Goal

  • Identify the individual tasks to achieve the Common Goal

  • Clearly communicate  the Common Goal and the individual tasks to the team

  • Discuss the strategies and tasks with the team and allow for questions and input

  • Analyse the individual team members, their skills and their responses to the Common Goal

  • Allocate the individual tasks to team members. Ensure each member understand what the whole team is doing

  • Lead but allow autonomy within tasks

  • Remember you may be the leader but your objective is for THE TEAM to be successful

  • Build RESPECT & TRUST with each member for the different skills and contributions they bring to the team

Sporting teams are very good examples of team work; as the batsmen toil in the sun chalking up a hundred runs do they resent the rest of the team sitting back in the pavilion? In a soccer game the goal keeper spends most of his time standing around whereas the forwards are running several kilometres, constantly tackling opposing players to gain control of the ball.

These sporting teams understand the essence of team work; it takes different members with different skills to tackle different tasks at differing times to deliver the very best result.

In my experience the more diverse the skills and personalities the more effective the team, be it a corporate management team, taskforce or board. I once served on a board with a co member of ferocious intellect, at times he and I arm-wrestled over finances and governance for an hour or so before reaching agreement. This was frustrating but never personal because the board had that magic ingredient RESPECT.

Without respect no team will function and without leadership no team will build and retain respect.

In summary there are as many differing “types of teams” as there are differing individuals and in theory no one type is better than another. The difference is in the quality of leadership, the clear communication of The Common Goal and the individual tasks task and most importantly the RESPECT & TRUST of the team members.

If you have respect and trust then yes   you are part of a team. If its lacking you are a part of a group of people……..quite a different beast!

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

Article shortlink:    http://wp.me/p401Wv-cI       

www.wardourcapital.com

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Casual Business Meeting

Meetings – Less pose, more work!

A good friend of mine is a leading global advisor to life insurance companies, he travels extensively and consults at board level. Recently I asked where his London office is now situated, “any Starbucks” was his answer. “Why have an office?” was his question, “the people I meet are too busy to travel and yet they appreciate 30 minutes relaxing over a coffee”.

For more formal presentations and planning sessions he uses his clients facilities, very occasionally he rents serviced office facilities by the hour.

“Put simply” he said “I have a simple rule; does this cost money or make money?” and in 2014 expensive offices certainly dont make money.

Likewise does dress at work really matter? If staff are clean and appropriately covered all that remains is motivation and productivity.

Today’s workplace freedoms would have been unimaginable 30 years ago and yet look at what we have gained by adopting the important factors of respect and comfort and letting the formal pose and its associated ego/status go.

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-cr

www.wardourcapital.com

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Entrepreneurs

The Naked Entrepreneur!

“to thine own self be true……………”

Respect and Trust are both vitally important qualities which we look for in an entrepreneur, and I fear both are currently being discarded in the rush for blatant self promotion.

Do you remember when the UK’s Jamie Oliver first burst onto our TV screens as “The Naked Chef”? He was fully clothed but he had stripped away the unnecessary bullsh*t and mystery surrounding cooking. The world fell in love with Jamie a self-confessed dyslexic, a school drop-out from Essex – he was simply and wonderfully himself!

As I read on-line profiles I feel emasculated by the fact that every second person is now “an expert on….”; “an author of” or at the very least an “international public speaker”. Some of these are well known and how lucky we are to have such easy access to the skills and knowledge which they have gained over long and successful careers. Many others and dare I say the majority, are if not bogus, then plain humbug!

Strong words and yet transparency and authenticity are more than just corporate “buzz words” they are amongst the real attributes that B2B’s and consumers now expect from the companies and people they do business with.

People want honesty in business and expect SME’s and corporations to provide real transparency and authenticity. They also want to know and understand the real people behind the profiles, websites, logos, social media and print.

Be open when describing yourself or your business. If your business is in its first year and you are struggling to make ends meet say so! Potential customers will often give a new business “a go”. How often have you said “hey let’s try that new pizza place”? Don’t invent a “construct” designed to make you look older, bigger, better, busier.

Be yourself! Just started – Johns Plumbing, I want to help! It’s a compelling message.

Today “Corporate Image” is less about status, qualifications, large offices and expensive stationary and much more about the real people, real skills and real results. Over the past week I had three meetings in coffee shops with clients, each of which is highly successful and controls a multinational business. Only one of them has a permanent office, shared with his accountant. Today working from home with a telephone answered or a query dealt with by a virtual assistant can be sufficient. 

Most businesses and consumers today don’t want to hear how clever you are or how important you are or how impressive your office is; they want to know if you can do the job and deliver the result at a price they are prepared to pay.

So rather than building an impossibly impressive on-line profile, simply state the facts; you are warm, human, competent, trustworthy and able to deliver results! It’s about engaging, sharing your passions, and talking about your product or service as it relates to other people and situations.

Here are some ways to show your inner Naked Entrepreneur:

  • Be Genuine: Be you, yourself, the real you and be proud to show it. Strip away the unnecessary bullsh*t and mystery!

  • Share your passions: Show what, how and why you are excited, if you have a dream share it.

  • Share your corporate culture: It says a great deal about who you are and the values you and your team share.

  • Admit your imperfections & failures: We have all at some stage failed, stretched the truth, let people down or just plain stuffed up – I have done all and more. It’s human. How you recover, learn and move forward is the real factor by which you are judged.

  • Show your expertise: Include your skills, knowledge and if wanted, qualifications on your profiles but do so to inform not to impress.

  • Be subtle: Yes you are brilliant, yes your brand is huge and of course your staff and customers adore you but do you need to tell us quite so loudly or so frequently.

  • Understand Yourself: Know your strengths, weaknesses and your limitations. For example I am a dreadful waffler and not the world’s best operational manager but when sat down free of distractions I am a fair theorist, thinker and strategist!

A reputation for being “a good person, hard working and determined to deliver” is probably close to perfection and almost naked!

Do you ever wonder why those global gurus who travel the world to sell their message of how to grow rich and famous in 30 days don’t have to stay home and manage their investment portfolios which must by now be huge? I have always wondered.

I guess they care about us so much they are prepared to travel 48 weeks a year just to help.

By Neil Steggall

Failed Wastrel

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-cm

www.wardourcapital.com

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Presenting WCP 2014 Stick Drawing

Speak Clearly and Communicate

How well do you convey your messages? Is it a question you examine or do you concentrate on the content of your speech?

We spend plenty of time thinking about what we say in business, but not necessarily how we say it.

When it comes to professional settings the way we speak including tone, pitch, and volume is every bit as important as content and dramatically affects how our message is received and how people perceive us.

It’s hard to recognize our own verbal errors so if regular presentations and occasional public speaking are starting to occur in your career it could be worth practicing speech in front of a specialist or a mentor to ensure you are hitting the right notes.

Pitching your voice and presentation at the right level is quite easy and becomes natural with experience and as you become less nervous. The important word here is NATURAL. The natural vocal sound is pleasing to hear, easy to follow and quietly authoritative.

Most of us can become good and interesting speakers with just a little skill and practice. Here are a few pointers on how to improve your presentations.

Speaking too quickly

Understandably when you are new to public speaking you are going to be nervous and rapid speech is a very common effect of nerves. Rapid speech not only makes the speaker hard to follow, it distracts the listener and undermines the strength and authority of your message.

Susan Finch, a New York based voice and speech coach who works with business professionals, says hasty speakers often end up “mumbling, rushing, and swallowing” their words. To address this, she instructs clients to take a breath before they begin speaking and again before each major point. That simple action creates a natural break in speech and helps the person to slow down.

Being Australian; or “up talk”

Australians are known for “lifting” the final vowels of a sentence, the best way of understanding this is to watch British comedy and see how they poke fun at us. This issue in speech is known as up talk; ending a statement on an upward pitch so that it sounds like a question even when it’s not.

According to Sydney speech coach Sandra Harris, this issue is more common in women. Speakers struggling with up talk should record themselves and then make an effort to keep their pitch from rising at the end of a sentence.

The Monotone

Nothing turns an audience off like a dull and boring presenter and the worst speaking mistake is to use a dull, monotone voice. We want to hear in the voice a relaxed enthusiasm and a pleasant assertiveness, keep your audience interested by projecting your excitement and passion for your subject.

That doesn’t mean going over the top with high and low pitches, but rather allowing for some degree of variation in the tone and colour of your phrasing. And the easiest way to achieve that effect is to breathe and relax, try to place a smile into your voice.

Duh, um, fillers

These, um, filler words are ubiquitous in everyday speech. “Like,” “um,” “er” and others are used routinely in casual conversations and often go unnoticed. But they really stand out when used in professional settings.

John West, head of the speech division at New York Speech Coaching, refers to words like these as “vocalized pauses.” People typically toss these sounds into speech because they fear that allowing for a pause will lose their listeners. On the contrary, West says it’s the speakers who use excessive “ums” and “uhs” that tend to lose their audience the fastest, and that a well-placed pause can pique listeners’ attention.

Whispering quietly

Speaking at the correct volume and with strong voice projection is important. Sandra Kazan, a New York based vocal coach, says the ability to project depends on each individuals voice. For example, high-pitched voices naturally project better and further than lower pitched ones.

“A nasal voice will carry, will probably not have very much problem projecting, but it is a very annoying voice to listen to for any amount of time,” she explains. As with pace, experts say the best fix for volume is to breathe well. Projection problems tend to occur when people tighten up, constricting their vocal chords and preventing a smooth flow of air.

Trailing off

In general speech we have a tendency to get quieter at the end of a sentence, to “trail off”. A commonly recognised speech pattern is to trail off toward the end of phrases, clauses, and sentences. This means important words can easily get lost or messages can appear incomplete. You need to keep your voice supported, level and your message carrying all the way to the end of the point you are making.

At the end of the day be it in a meeting or a conference people want to hear your comments, words, ideas and knowledge. Give just that, hone your presentation but most importantly be you. Breathe deeply and regularly, pace yourself and impart your message. You will not only become an interesting speaker but you will enjoy the process.

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bH

www.wardourcapital.com

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True Success - WCP 2014

SUCCESS!!! Can everyone succeed?

Have you ever gone along to one of those meetings where only as you arrive do you realise the objective is to recruit you into Multi-Level Marketing? ……I have.

At first analysis the system is fool proof. Follow the program, build your team, sell some product and you are going to be rich and successful!

It demonstrates the simplicity of applied logic and the leveraging of numbers; and yet…….less than 1 in 1,000 recruits are successful.

Basically the MLM system fails to deliver because it is a numbers game dependent upon you being the possessor of a hide thicker than an elephants. It requires exacting teamwork from a large number of disparate people each with a differing view of “their” business and differing needs and wants.

The logic fails the humanity test.

Click on any social media site or online magazine today and you are overwhelmed by articles and ads offering SUCCESS in 1,2,3 or 5 simple steps. Do these programs work?

I may well lose friends and totally fail to influence people here but I think most of this is poppycock and hype. Sheer unadulterated psychobabble perpetrated by the need to fill space and the never ending need of people to hear their own voice or see their name in print. And yes don’t rush off to check…..I have in the past written the 5 Key Steps to…..etc. I am now maturing!

All right…..send your email now signed “Disgruntled and Disgusted” of ……..(enter suburb).

Let’s step back a little and consider the early management advice of one of my key influencers and a true management guru, Peter Drucker. He really thought deeply about business and business success. One can gauge the very depth of his thinking by his brevity of words and his no nonsense common sense, I offer a few simple Drucker quotes below:-

  1. “The purpose of business is to create and keep a customer.”

  2.  “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.”

  3. “What’s measured improves”

  4. “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.”

  5. “Until we can manage time, we can manage nothing else.”

  6.  “Success comes to those who know themselves – their strengths, their values, and how they best perform.”

It was hard to choose these six almost primitively simple Drucker quotes as they were chosen from around 300 Drucker quotes collected on my computer. Each quote deserves contemplation and through contemplation will provide an essential element of management.

Each quote hints at and leads the mind to see the larger plan behind and excitingly that unfolding image will be as powerful, as functional and yet different to each one of us.

In my mind his thinking reduces management to its core componentry, there are no new Emperors Clothes on promise here.

So what is SUCCESS? Let’s look first at what it is not. It is not big cars, big spending, private jets, corporate jaunts and attractive sexy partners; they are life style choices.

SUCCESS is achieving your own goals or your own objectives. If you set out to complete task (a) today, when finished you have succeeded. In Drucker’s mind the 6 quotes above would when understood and implemented represent 6 huge successes which, as a whole would represent a far greater, lasting, collective success.

SUCCESS is not the destination it is the culmination of the hundreds, possibly thousands of small successes you achieve along the journey. As with any great structure designed and built intelligently and with care the end result is always stronger and more resilient than its constituent parts. This is SUCCESS.

Can everyone succeed? No. Business requires certain personality traits and a good deal of skill, vision, courage, determination, stress and complexity. This is more than some people want or can handle.

Certainly through start up almost every business is a very hot kitchen to be in! To not have the desire or the personality to run a business is not a failure it is a simple fact.

Where does this leave us? In my opinion with four critical attributes (yes I know!) you can probably succeed in business:-

  • A sound product or service

  • Confidence in yourself and your vision

  • A written business plan including objectives, marketing and basic financials which you measure the business against

  • Absolute guts, determination and a preparedness for hard work

Perhaps business success really comes down to that final dot point!

By: Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bC

www.wardourcapital.com

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Integrity 2 WCP

Leading with Integrity

Leadership goes hand in hand with the power team of Trust and Respect. To build a reputation for Trust and Respect you need to demonstrate a high level of Integrity and unfortunately integrity can be a contradiction in today’s workplace.

Some years ago I had to dismiss a team member who was great at his job and he and his wife had become good family friends. The reason was simple; he had made a fatal error of judgement and in doing so had, to the wider team, lost his integrity.

The label of integrity is hard to earn and yet it can be lost in a single action. I am not even sure it is something we consciously look for in someone but we notice when it is missing.

It is only after we have considered our own actions, evaluating how they align with our personal values, intentions, and deeds, that we are most likely to make a contribution of integrity to the world.

We are each responsible for our own integrity and the best leaders create cultures that nourish the integrity of others.

At its root of the word integrity we find; to “integer” and “integrate”, it speaks of unity and wholeness. We still think of the word in this original sense when we talk about “structural integrity,” the quality that enables a building to stand and that, when lost, lets a building collapse under its own weight.

As US Rabbi Jonathon Omer-Man said, “Integrity is the ability to listen to the place inside oneself that doesn’t change, even though the life that carries it may change.”

Most of us evolve and develop throughout our journey as leaders. Our character and our integrity are remembered long after the glitter of the deals has faded.

Having integrity leads to the building of trust as we practice honest conversations with others. Integrity is a positive deposit in the bank of our connections.

Trust is an inherent part of integrity. People need to trust that leadership is serving everyone’s best interest and leadership needs to trust that team members are fulfilling their own responsibilities.

HOW DO WE IMPROVE LEADERSHIP INTEGRITY?

This possibly varies person to person but the following points, in my opinion, cover integrity within leadership.

  • Respect – practice integrity with others by treating them with respect — even when they do not live up to your personal expectations of them. Recognise that your own standards can be subject to question. We get and give the best of each other in a culture that supports respect.

  • Reliability – This is a more functional definition of integrity and a basic practise of a natural leader. It includes showing a little humility, keeping promises, meeting important deadlines and being there when people need you.

  • Sharing – It’s important for leaders to clearly articulate their values and expectation of integrity. Share these values as a culture-building objective as to how we collectively define integrity.

  • Responsibility – We need to acknowledge our responsibility for every one of our actions. It demonstrates that we are not using other people or external events as the cause of our problems. Wherever possible blame no one, accept the behaviour of others and the circumstances of an action as a given, and move forward.

  • Considered Actions – This is the leader’s obligation to take the right action. It means embodying our integral principles and accepting the consequences for our actions.

  • Thinking 360° – Think of the whole not just this one problem or decision, integrity can be viewed as a culture of wholeness, of being able to support all of the components for the long term good of all.

I have to admit that I have on numerous occasions made decisions or taken a course of action that would not withstand scrutiny of the points above. This is where self-awareness comes in and that question; “What is the correct course?” and remember life is a journey, good and bad……we can only do our best as we see it at the time!

Corporate responsibility and integrity make strange if not incompatible bed fellows and over the years have formed much discussion over the dinner table. In this article I am really only trying to examine questions of integrity in leadership.

Examining integrity at an intellectual level seems to raise more questions than answers. Mistakes will always made and occasionally poor judgement will be shown. Importantly we are now aware of some of the questions and it’s what we learn and how we adapt to our mistakes that we should now contemplate.

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bj

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

www.wardourcapital.com

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Communication 2

The Power of Great Communication

And……..How-to-become-a-great-communicator.

Often after first drafting a speech or an article I look through and ask myself the question “what would my wife cut out of this?” Invariably its 60% or so of what I have written. My wife, I should add, is a successful author, journalist and historian and she can paint amazing mind images with such economy of words.

What I realise is that with discipline I can and do communicate well but I am not a natural. As I commence a story around the family dinner table the “children”, largely grown and successful now, groan and shout “make it quick or we are leaving” or “oh not that one again.”

Whilst not comparing myself (lol) with great communicators such as Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, John F Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, Nelson Mandela and Paul Keating I do occasionally wonder how Sunday lunch went down at their house.

Peggy Noonan was presidential speechwriter for most of Ronald Reagan’s presidency and she explains why Reagan’s presidency had such an impact on the world stage.

“He was often moving, but he was moving not because of the way he said things, he was moving because of what he said. He didn’t say things in a big way; he said big things … Writers, reporters and historians were in a quandary in the Reagan years. ‘The People,’ as they put it, were obviously impressed by much of what Reagan said; this could not be completely dismissed.”

Reagan was known as “The Great Communicator”, yet it’s a nickname he didn’taltogether agree with.  In his farewell address to the nation and to the world, in his own humble way, he redirected the praise by saying:

“In all of that time I won a nickname, ‘The Great Communicator.’ But I never thought it was my style or the words I used that made a difference: It was the content. I wasn’t a great communicator, but I communicated great things, and they didn’t spring full bloom from my brow, they came from the heart of a great nation — from our experience, our wisdom, and our belief in principles that have guided us for two centuries.”

My take on this is that it doesn’t matter whether you are a president or a manager – your success will depend heavily on your communication skill.

What are the key actions of great communicators?

Engagement

Communication is just that, it’s a two way flow of information. Great communicators know how to give and take and understand its importance. They not only initiate conversation, they steer the direction of and encourage others to join in the conversation.

Connection

Great communicators know that people won’t listen unless they connect both intellectually and emotionally. Know your audience and start by conveying emotional stories that connect to their heart. It’s all about the quality of the relationships the leader has with the people they communicate with.

I know several tough and very senior Australian business leaders who have met Bill Clinton on separate occasions both in Australia and in the US, each was impressed. In my post meeting discussions with them each said that when Bill Clinton talks with you, he makes you feel like you are the only person in the world. Wow. Show your listeners your empathy let them feel it and know you value their importance.

Humour

Great communicators are skilled in relaxing those with whom they communicate. An audience is often suspicious or defensive from over-communication and perhaps afraid of being “sold something”.  Great communicators show genuine interest in the other person and use humour and authenticity to come across as understandable and authentic..

Clarification

If you overwhelm your listeners, you will lose them, they will tune you out from boredom or confusion. Reagan was best known for being simple and clear. Never assume just because you understand what you’re saying that your audience does as well. Great communicators find ways to simplify though issues without being condescending.

Reinforcement

Great communicators know that an audience will retain only ten percent of what they hear, and therefore they are skilled at subtly reinforcing key ideas. They re-run their message throughout their presentations, speeches and writings. It is all about context and repetition.

Well I reckon that given the chance “my editor” would have pulled 15% of this and yet I think we are communicating OK!

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-b0

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

www.wardourcapital.com

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