Teamwork

Rotten Apple

Loyalty, respect and support for team members are values instilled in us from childhood and they are certainly amongst the key attributes of successful leaders. A recent review has caused me to recognise that at times we may carry loyalty too far and we risk severe consequences by doing so.

In a recent review of two unrelated corporate failures I realised that each business suffered enormous damage as a direct consequence of disenfranchised and under performing senior managers. With the benefit of hindsight we can see that it is possible that if these managers had been removed 12 months earlier each company may well have survived.

Why are such managers retained? It is likely that their shortcomings have been recognised and discussed with them during performance reviews or following poor management decisions or errors of judgement. When faced with the prospect of dismissing them their line manager has almost certainly taken into account:

  • The monetary cost of replacing them

  • The productivity loss from replacing them and retraining a replacement

  • The disruption within the team or business unit

These are rarely valid arguments a bad manager will cause a disproportionate level of problems which may well lay hidden for months before something finally breaks. Further a bad manager is fracturing the team and negatively influencing others.

What are the solutions?

  1. Only recruit the best: By recruiting the best possible people you are taking primary responsibility for quality – you dramatically reduce the risk of future problems.

  2. Always Reference Check: When recruiting don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions of current or ex employers, yes we need great technical and educational skills but what about their interpersonal skills. Are they team players, do they play favourites or get involved in office politics.

  3. Formal Process: I have a policy that senior people are employed on the understanding that they will face a 180 day performance review – fail that review and its sudden death.

  4. All or nothing: Being mostly a team player is like being “slightly pregnant”; it’s just not on and it’s not going to work.

Now it may sound tough but if one of your apples is looking bad throw it away and do it quickly. Your team will thank you and your bottom line will prosper.

By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-ip

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New Ideas - wcp 2014

Leader or Manager? – Vive la Différence!

The terms leadership and management are often used to describe the same person or even used as though the words are interchangeable. They are not. The differences between leadership and management are vast and varied and placing the wrong person in the wrong position could have dire consequences for your business.

Leaders are rarely great managers and vice versa. Both are much needed and both have very different skill sets needed to build and sustain a successful modern business.

In his book: Management, the Individual and Society, Peter Drucker stated that “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Whilst the phrasing of this is a little “clunky” I have thought about the quote over many years and I cannot really improve upon it.

There is no hierarchy between the two but it is important to recognise which is which as early as possible both to ensure each individual receives the best training and support and to plan where in your organisational structure these Leaders and Managers are going to fit. Understanding who your leaders and managers are will assist in strengthening your organisation and its corporate culture and morale.

Good leaders have a unique ability to rally team members around a vision. Their belief in the vision is so strong, and they are so passionate about achieving it that team members will naturally want to follow them. Leaders also tend to be willing to take risks in pursuit of the vision.

Managers, however, are far more adept at executing the vision in a very precise and systematic way, taking responsibility for the infrastructure and detail of the vision and working with the team to see the job done. Managers are usually very risk-adverse.

It is the combination of these two skill sets working in harmony which often differentiates two seemingly similar organisations.

I have often likened leaders & managers to composers and conductors. The composer creates the dream or vision and the conductor delivers it.

By, Neil Steggall

 

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

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Creating an Entrepreneur - WCP 2013

Creating an Entrepreneur!

Is it possible….YES it is!

 

Entrepreneurs can be seen as the rocket fuel of new ideas, they create new businesses and form new industries and in common with such dangerous fuels entrepreneurs can occasionally end with an explosion, yet despite the occasional explosion we have to accept that entrepreneurs have driven commerce and commercial ideas forward for millennia.

Why are entrepreneurs and sound corporate management generally seen as oxymoronic? A commonly held corporate view is that entrepreneurs are too highly individual, unpredictable, difficult personalities and when it comes to team work and the subtleties of the office culture…..well perhaps it’s best not to go there!

Is this a fair view in today’s market or a historical carry over? Well perhaps it is time to re-assess, as entrepreneurs are changing and today’s business schools and universities are turning out business and law graduates with specific qualifications in entrepreneurship.

Having a brilliant, yet well rounded entrepreneur within a company could provide a much needed boost for most organisations. Imagine; a manager who embraces autonomy, who can not only see the problems but looks beyond to the solutions and the potential opportunities which can flow from the solutions.

A new generation of innovative and creative executives who can transform  ideas into profitable ventures. They strike the perfect balance – they look, act and think like entrepreneurs, but they work for the corporation. As any manager knows, such entrepreneurial team members are a rarity; however, this need not be the case.

Why not change your management culture to enable your future leaders to become more creative and entrepreneurial by developing a focused culture where innovation and creative thinking is encouraged, supported and of course rewarded.

One of the main problems facing many organisations is that they have lost sight of the importance of fostering creative thinking and innovation. They have become afraid of change and in doing so they are placing their business at risk and allowing their competition a valuable advantage.

Innovation should be seen as your ultimate corporate advantage and innovation springs from the minds of motivated and engaged employees, yes your entrepreneurs!

In the sixth century Sun Zu said “you may survive though defence but you can only win by attacking” and more recently Peter Drucker said “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.” Of course the most efficient and lasting method of attacking your competition is through marketing and innovation.

So what can your business do to be more competitive, to as Sun Zu recommends, “go on the attack?”

A decision to attack can filter down from the board through the CEO or an entrepreneurial culture within the organisation of creative thinking and visionary innovation can develop the strategy and sell it up the ladder.

Either route is possible but the latter will always deliver a better result.

A successful organisations culture inevitably stems from good leadership. This doesn’t mean that the board or the CEO have great ideas, they may have, but more importantly they create the environment in which managers are given the freedom and confidence to experiment and innovate. A management team encouraged to think and innovate will be motivated and will form a strong and positive corporate culture.

So how can we turn this into reality and create an entrepreneurial environment in your organisation? Here are my 7 steps to creating an entrepreneur:

  1. Create the environment. Ensure that management feel free and secure in scoping new ideas, in testing the established methods, in questioning and innovating at all levels and across all ideas. Allow for failures, if one out of ten ideas succeeds that’s probably a good trend line, eventually one of these ideas will boom!

  2. Thoroughly research and understand your customer and market needs and how well those needs are being met, look at how your organisation and products are perceived and then turn the table and examine your competitors. Equalling the value of competitive offerings is not going to “cut the mustard” if you want to win you must always ensure that you are leading the field in Marketing and Innovation and following through on customer service. Encourage your team to be bold, be different and be the best.

  3. Assume responsibility for your organisations cultural change and encourage and empower people to bring forward and implement their ideas and innovations.

  4. Support, learn from and work through the failures. If you get two or three successful new ideas and one absolute winner out of every ten pursued you are ahead of the trend line.

  5. Constantly strive to improve, to innovate and to lead, implement a strategy of marginal gains (The Power of Marginal Gains http://wp.me/p401Wv-di ) you will be surprised by the strength of results.

  6. Never underestimate your competitors, look at today’s automotive brands compared with those of 30 years ago. The industry initially laughed at Japan’s underpowered, small cars with floral carpets and upholstery but few would laugh today. Again Marketing & Innovation win!

  7. Your staff are outstandingly flexible and reliable assets to be deployed in the building of your business. Never see them as a cost, create an atmosphere of respect, treat employees as the rare and valuable resource they are and you will both reap the rewards of an exciting and vibrant corporate culture.

Some of the best ideas and simplest innovations are from businesses that already have had such a drive or survived times of stress. Don’t always look to reinvent the wheel, occasionally take the world’s best wheel and simply improve it. Sometimes copying is the best route forward, look at how the Japanese destroyed the UK motorcycle industry in the 1960’s and 70’s, they initially copied the UK machines and then introduced innovative and more advanced products.

 In the end, innovation is an state of mind. Train your key people to think and see differently, to search every day for the new, the better, form, function, value and service. This is where Steve Jobs was masterful in transforming not only an industry which he had helped create but in transforming the culture of a major global enterprise.

The value of leadership and empowering your management is enormous and in truth no one has a choice in the matter. Everyone must adapt, change and innovate and we can all with training, help and enthusiasm become entrepreneurs.

Empowering employees to be innovative and creative, and encouraging a ‘can do’ attitude can reap rewards for everyone – whether monetary or reward based – and companies that do this are more likely to survive the recession.

A recent show on the ABC called Redesign My Brain, hosted by Todd Samson, shows just how adaptable to new ideas, concepts and skills our brains are.

It has been said so many times but the answer is to constantly look beyond the horizon and use 360 degree vision and thinking.

 

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-gv

 www.wardourcapital.com

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Leadership Attitude WCP 2014

“The Essence of Leadership”

 

I recently completed a series of short presentations on the 10 key aspects of SME Management. They are deliberately short, condensed and to the point, so much so that I have used an expression from the kitchen and called the series the “Essence of Management”

Those of you who know me or are regular readers of my articles you know my reputation as an unmitigated waffler so reducing complex points to an essence whilst retaining both relevance and interest was quite a challenge!

To be a good leader you need to grasp, understand and build on “The 3 C’s of Leadership”

  1. Competence: your ability to do the job

  2. Credibility: ensuring others believe you can do the job

  3. Confidence: knowing you can do the job and that others believe in you. You have a sense of purpose.

So there you have it!!….Leadership Essence.

Now to provide a little polish before you pin on the Gold Leadership Star.

  • It’s okay to show humility. When you make a mistake admit it, own it and own the solution. Don’t wallow in a bath of negativity, just fix your mistake and move forward.

  • Accept that we all lack some awareness of our own strengths and weaknesses. This acceptance allows people to see and know a little about who and what you are as a leader.

  • Set time some each week to reflect on your leadership. Respect this time as you would an important meeting and be there.

  • Praise and thank your team. Let them feel the win! Take your pride in theirs. Your win in their win.

  • Lead. Show a sense of purpose. Where are you leading? Why are you leading? Why is it important to the organisation?  Communicate these points clearly and frequently lead your team through them.

 “Leadership Presence” . . . is the way you connect with people. Look and act the part.

Leadership is about the people you serve, but it’s also about you. As the leader it is your responsibility to create the conditions and supply the tools for your team to succeed. If you lead well the team will follow, there is a quotient of reciprocity, your team will realise this, it’s called respect.

As the leader you have an advantage; use it for the good of your team. Humility is a sign of strength of character, a sign of self-awareness, and also, it’s a sense of humanity.

Sip on this essence and think about leadership!

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SMS Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-dE

www.wardourcapital.com

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Winning WCP 2013

The Power of Marginal Gains

I first heard of the power of marginal gains as a student. Back then “the power” of ideas such as marginal gains, marginal pricing,  marginal costing, marginal probability and compound interest were all being used in business studies to show how something didn’t have to be “wiz, bang, new, fast and you beaut” to make a difference. It was power man!

Compounding interest has continued to fascinate me and occasionally I while away the odd hour on Excel running compounding options. Truly fascinating…..really! The largest deal I ever closed was when as a young executive I convinced the board of a major American company to supply us on the basis of marginal costing.

Recently on a quiet Saturday (I know it’s sad) I googled “The Power of Marginal Gains” expecting to find a plethora of MBA theses on the subject but instead I found page after page of British cycling triumphs and a guy called Dave Brailsford – Now Sir Dave all thanks to his marginal gains!

British Cycling…….Why?

No British cyclist had ever won the Tour de France, but as the new General Manager and Performance Director for Team Sky (Great Britain’s professional cycling team), that’s what Brailsford was asked to do.

His approach was simple.

Brailsford believed in a concept that he referred to as the “aggregation of marginal gains.” He explained it as the “1 percent margin for improvement in everything you do.” His belief was that if you improved every area related to cycling by just 1 percent, then those small gains would add up to remarkable improvement.

They started by optimizing the things you might expect: the nutrition of riders, their weekly training program, the ergonomics of the bike seat, and the weight of the tires.

But Brailsford and his team didn’t stop there. They searched for 1 percent improvements in tiny areas that were overlooked by almost everyone else: discovering the pillow that offered the best sleep and taking it with them to hotels, testing for the most effective type of massage gel, and teaching riders the best way to wash their hands to avoid infection. They searched for 1 percent improvements everywhere.

Brailsford believed that if they could successfully execute this strategy, then Team Sky would be in a position to win the Tour de France in five years’ time.

He was wrong. They won it in three years.

In 2012, Team Sky rider Sir Bradley Wiggins became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France. That same year, Brailsford coached the British cycling team at the 2012 Olympic Games and dominated the competition by winning 70 percent of the gold medals available.

In 2013, Team Sky repeated their feat by winning the Tour de France again, this time with rider Chris Froome. Many have referred to the British cycling feats in the Olympics and the Tour de France over the past 10 years as the most successful run in modern cycling history.

And now for the important question: what can we learn from Brailsford’s approach?

The Aggregation of Marginal Gains

It’s so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making better decisions on a daily basis.

Almost every habit that you have — good or bad — is the result of many small decisions over time.

And yet, how easily we forget this when we want to make a change.

So often we convince ourselves that change is only meaningful if there is some large, visible outcome associated with it. Whether it is losing weight, building a business, travelling the world or any other goal, we often put pressure on ourselves to make some earth-shattering improvement that everyone will talk about.

Meanwhile, improving by just 1 percent isn’t notable (and sometimes it isn’t even noticeable). But it can be just as meaningful, especially over time.

And from what I can tell, this pattern works the same way in reverse (in other words an aggregation of marginal losses) a 1 percent decline here and there — that eventually leads to a problem.

In the beginning, there is basically no difference between making a choice that is 1% better or 1% worse. (In other words, it won’t impact you very much today.) But as time goes on, these small improvements or declines compound and you suddenly find a very big gap between people who make slightly better decisions on a daily basis and those who don’t. This is why small choices (“I’ll take fries with that”) don’t make much of a difference at the time, but add up over a period.

The Bottom Line

Success is a few simple disciplines, practised every day; while failure is simply a few errors in judgement, repeated every day.

Most people love to talk about success (and life in general) as an event. We talk about losing 50 pounds or building a successful business as if they are events. But the truth is that most of the significant things in life aren’t stand-alone events, but rather the sum of all the moments when we chose to do things 1 percent better or 1 percent worse. Aggregating these marginal gains makes a difference.

There is enormous power in small steady wins. This is why the tortoise usually beats the rabbit, the system is greater than the goal.

Where are the 1 percent improvements in your life?

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-di

www.wardourcapital.com

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Great-Teams - Win - WCP 1014

Great Teams Win!

And Keep on Winning

We Aussies know all about teams.

We have the AFL the NRL, the Premier League, not to mention cricket, hockey, swimming, tennis, netball, bowls and of course the local drinking team.

Every one of us passionately follows a team or two so of course we know all about team work…..don’t we?

In management speak we come across the words team, teamwork, team building, team targets every day without giving a very much thought as to what a team really is and how it functions.

The most simplistic and common dictionary definition of a team is: “to come together to achieve a common goal”. Essentially the objective of teamwork is to achieve more than the sum total of the individual people involved.

Pretty simple hey? And yet recently I came across two comments which demonstrated to me that not everyone finds the team concept so simple.

The first comment was in the form of a question to a SME advice column in a major daily newspaper – “I recently started a small business with a partner and he doesn’t work as hard as me. How can I get him to lift his input?”

The second was a question asked during a seminar “As a team leader I find it very difficult getting everyone in a team to contribute equally; what do you recommend?”

In both instances my thought was that these guys just don’t understand team work!

Let’s return to the definition and to that “common goal”. The first thing a good team leader does is to define the “common goal” the individual tasks out and best match the team members to the task. A simple team check list can help such as:-

  • Very clearly and simply define the Common Goal

  • Determine the best strategies to achieve the Common Goal

  • Identify the individual tasks to achieve the Common Goal

  • Clearly communicate  the Common Goal and the individual tasks to the team

  • Discuss the strategies and tasks with the team and allow for questions and input

  • Analyse the individual team members, their skills and their responses to the Common Goal

  • Allocate the individual tasks to team members. Ensure each member understand what the whole team is doing

  • Lead but allow autonomy within tasks

  • Remember you may be the leader but your objective is for THE TEAM to be successful

  • Build RESPECT & TRUST with each member for the different skills and contributions they bring to the team

Sporting teams are very good examples of team work; as the batsmen toil in the sun chalking up a hundred runs do they resent the rest of the team sitting back in the pavilion? In a soccer game the goal keeper spends most of his time standing around whereas the forwards are running several kilometres, constantly tackling opposing players to gain control of the ball.

These sporting teams understand the essence of team work; it takes different members with different skills to tackle different tasks at differing times to deliver the very best result.

In my experience the more diverse the skills and personalities the more effective the team, be it a corporate management team, taskforce or board. I once served on a board with a co member of ferocious intellect, at times he and I arm-wrestled over finances and governance for an hour or so before reaching agreement. This was frustrating but never personal because the board had that magic ingredient RESPECT.

Without respect no team will function and without leadership no team will build and retain respect.

In summary there are as many differing “types of teams” as there are differing individuals and in theory no one type is better than another. The difference is in the quality of leadership, the clear communication of The Common Goal and the individual tasks task and most importantly the RESPECT & TRUST of the team members.

If you have respect and trust then yes   you are part of a team. If its lacking you are a part of a group of people……..quite a different beast!

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

Article shortlink:    http://wp.me/p401Wv-cI       

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Teamwork

A STRONG TEAM

IS

VITAL TO SUCCESS

Early in my career it was noted that “I didn’t suffer fools gladly”. At the time I took it as a compliment as I couldn’t understand why some of the people in the organisation just couldn’t grasp the problem, yet alone see the solution and fix it. Clearly they were fools!

As I travelled around the organisation from city to city reviewing performance I was unbeknown to me leaving a trail of emotional disaster and disharmony. One day the CEO sat down in my office and declared that if he could lock me in that room, push problems under the door and wait for me to push the solutions back out some time later, we could change the world. Yes this was the pre computer age and I had to change.

Whilst I had grasped problem solving I had little idea of or interest in the team. I was just so absorbed with problems and their solutions.

I am now much better, though still not good, at team work but I have recognised that a good team is both high performing and exciting to work in. Results flow from great teams.

Cerebral loneliness is a very real problem, I need the companionship of strong thinkers to challenge and spark my own mind. Brilliant ideas are rarely born in isolation, and successful projects stem from a strong, collective team. Without the spark of companionable challenge I find I can become almost self-destructive in my thinking.

In other words, to do great work, you must surround yourself with great people.

It’s an interesting exercise to define what this means for the type of thinkers you want on your team. I find that my best work comes from interaction with people who think differently than I do – and differently from each other. A diversity of mental profiles yields the richest results. Here are six personality types I would have on my dream team.

1. The dreamer: This person never ceases imagining what’s not, what’s next and what’s possible. They think big and hopefully, stretching the bounds of what is considered achievable. They never stop asking, “what if?’ and supply your team with an electric and optimistic creative energy.

2. The debater: Debaters question your assumptions, call out your leap of faith logic and point out the flaws in the plan. They see problems long before others, and they keep everyone grounded and prepared. Their questioning nature forces you to strengthen the rigor of your arguments.

3. The disruptor: The disruptor challenges the status quo and breaks others out of their mental ruts and insular perspective by bringing fresh and far-ranging perspective. My favourite disruptors are intellectually curious, lateral thinkers who are first to spot latent competitors and untapped opportunities in the market.

4. The driver: Drivers are natural leaders, bringing a crusading, concentrated vision to all work and supplying forward momentum when everyone else is losing steam or motivation. They are positively relentless in pursuing an idea, galvanizing political support for it and keeping it on track. They can be fantastic advocates for the customer, and at times hard drivers keeping the team focused on the problem you’re here to solve.

5. The detailer: This type digs into every facet of a project. Detailers focus on practicalities and save everyone else from silly mistakes and fatal design flaws because they think through all the angles and implications. They identify what’s missing in even the best-laid plans and can diagnose the precise point when something could break or be improved.

6. The doer: The doer is the wonderfully resourceful team member who gets stuff done, no matter what. Doers roll up their sleeves and find the practical solutions to delivering products services and “what-nots” on time and on budget. They are great colleagues to those who devise the grand strategy because they get it delivered on time, all the time.

Do you recognise your team members here or see gaps in your own team? Do you think of attributes that I may have missed. Let me know or post your comments below.

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-7N

www.wardourcapital.com

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October 22, 2013