innovation and morale

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Integrity 2 WCP

Leading with Integrity

Leadership goes hand in hand with the power team of Trust and Respect. To build a reputation for Trust and Respect you need to demonstrate a high level of Integrity and unfortunately integrity can be a contradiction in today’s workplace.

Some years ago I had to dismiss a team member who was great at his job and he and his wife had become good family friends. The reason was simple; he had made a fatal error of judgement and in doing so had, to the wider team, lost his integrity.

The label of integrity is hard to earn and yet it can be lost in a single action. I am not even sure it is something we consciously look for in someone but we notice when it is missing.

It is only after we have considered our own actions, evaluating how they align with our personal values, intentions, and deeds, that we are most likely to make a contribution of integrity to the world.

We are each responsible for our own integrity and the best leaders create cultures that nourish the integrity of others.

At its root of the word integrity we find; to “integer” and “integrate”, it speaks of unity and wholeness. We still think of the word in this original sense when we talk about “structural integrity,” the quality that enables a building to stand and that, when lost, lets a building collapse under its own weight.

As US Rabbi Jonathon Omer-Man said, “Integrity is the ability to listen to the place inside oneself that doesn’t change, even though the life that carries it may change.”

Most of us evolve and develop throughout our journey as leaders. Our character and our integrity are remembered long after the glitter of the deals has faded.

Having integrity leads to the building of trust as we practice honest conversations with others. Integrity is a positive deposit in the bank of our connections.

Trust is an inherent part of integrity. People need to trust that leadership is serving everyone’s best interest and leadership needs to trust that team members are fulfilling their own responsibilities.

HOW DO WE IMPROVE LEADERSHIP INTEGRITY?

This possibly varies person to person but the following points, in my opinion, cover integrity within leadership.

  • Respect – practice integrity with others by treating them with respect — even when they do not live up to your personal expectations of them. Recognise that your own standards can be subject to question. We get and give the best of each other in a culture that supports respect.

  • Reliability – This is a more functional definition of integrity and a basic practise of a natural leader. It includes showing a little humility, keeping promises, meeting important deadlines and being there when people need you.

  • Sharing – It’s important for leaders to clearly articulate their values and expectation of integrity. Share these values as a culture-building objective as to how we collectively define integrity.

  • Responsibility – We need to acknowledge our responsibility for every one of our actions. It demonstrates that we are not using other people or external events as the cause of our problems. Wherever possible blame no one, accept the behaviour of others and the circumstances of an action as a given, and move forward.

  • Considered Actions – This is the leader’s obligation to take the right action. It means embodying our integral principles and accepting the consequences for our actions.

  • Thinking 360° – Think of the whole not just this one problem or decision, integrity can be viewed as a culture of wholeness, of being able to support all of the components for the long term good of all.

I have to admit that I have on numerous occasions made decisions or taken a course of action that would not withstand scrutiny of the points above. This is where self-awareness comes in and that question; “What is the correct course?” and remember life is a journey, good and bad……we can only do our best as we see it at the time!

Corporate responsibility and integrity make strange if not incompatible bed fellows and over the years have formed much discussion over the dinner table. In this article I am really only trying to examine questions of integrity in leadership.

Examining integrity at an intellectual level seems to raise more questions than answers. Mistakes will always made and occasionally poor judgement will be shown. Importantly we are now aware of some of the questions and it’s what we learn and how we adapt to our mistakes that we should now contemplate.

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bj

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

www.wardourcapital.com

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entrepreneurs

Creating an Entrepreneur!

Is it possible….you better believe it!

 

Entrepreneurs are often the rocket fuel which drives new ideas, creates new businesses and indeed new industries. In common with such inflammable fuels entrepreneurs can often end with a bang but overall they have driven commerce and commercial ideas for millennia.

Most entrepreneurs tend to be highly individual, difficult and unpredictable and lacking in reputation when it comes to team work and the subtleties of the office culture. This is changing as most business schools and universities are turning out graduates with qualifications in entrepreneurship.

Having tame yet empowered entrepreneurs within a company is the dream for most business owners. These are employees who will undertake something new, without being asked to do so. They are innovative and creative – they are people who can transform an idea into a profitable venture for your business. They strike the perfect balance – act like entrepreneurs, but they work for you.

But as any business manager will know, such individual entrepreneurs are a rarity, however, this needn’t be the case. Every employee can become more creative and entrepreneurial if their company adopts a different approach to their development and cultivates a culture where innovation and creative thinking is encouraged and supported.

One of the main problems facing many Australian businesses is that they have lost sight of the importance of fostering creative thinking and innovation. In doing so, they are placing their business at risk and giving the competition a serious advantage.

We can’t lose sight of the fact that the economic crisis has turned many offices into high pressured working environments, where employee engagement and confidence has been eroded. In such businesses energy, creativity and innovative thinking has been lost.

However, what has also emerged is a (it’s not us) blame culture where business people are blaming their current poor business performance solely on the recession and external factors. But this is a bit like complaining that you are wet because it’s raining. How about wearing a raincoat? Businesses have a duty to prepare for the future upturn and ramp up their competitiveness.

The actual ‘raincoat’ for business is not to cut costs and act in defence; it is to build resources and attack. Sun Tzu in the sixth century said that you may survive though defence but you can only win by attacking. One of the oddest paradoxes of the business world is how many business owners never even see themselves in a competitive situation. Absurd! Competition in so many forms is ever present and can never be ignored.

So what can businesses do to be more competitive? It is in times of adversity that some of the greatest innovations have appeared and in today’s straightened times there is a healthy pressure to differentiate, become more competitive and establish more intrinsic value in the organisation. Does this come about by exhortations by the CEO or by establishing a culture of freedom to think and innovate? It may be the former but it must be the latter.

It is down to business managers and the HR department to establish a culture where intellectual power within the company is harnessed to the betterment of innovation and in so doing equals motivation, productivity and profits. An energised workforce is an effective and content one.

Most people in an organisation have enough insight of what is going on to be able to contribute to innovation. However, we are not talking just about suggestion boxes. I am referring to special projects and cross functional work groups to establish innovation in products, service and operations.

Managers need to make it clear that this is not a one off; to create sustained motivation, people must feel valued. Leadership has to be consistent and authentic in the way that it empowers teams to be create

Here are some ways of encouraging creativity and innovation:

Innovation       

1. Understand and know what the market wants, but know more about what your competitors are offering and how they behave.
Competitors of all kinds are the minimum benchmark for which to aim. Equalling the value of competitive offerings is rarely going to suffice – always ensure you are moving to stay ahead. Look at every weakness in competitor offerings and operations and use advanced brain storming tools such as ‘meta planning’ to develop and refine the winning concepts. To win you must find that point of difference and it’s usually a combination of ingredients which becomes – your winning recipe

2. Empower people to implement their innovations.

3. Make it clear that a business must always rethink, reposition, invest and develop its products and services.
NEVER stand still. Even those lucky enough to have patent or intellectual property protection must seek to acquire more advantages. If in any doubt about this then compare the car manufacturers on the road today with those of thirty years ago. GM laughed at the Japanese cars with their floral carpets and tiny engines. England was the undeniably solid centre of motorcycle production.

4. The customer is always a good start point for innovative thinking and should be a central focus for the whole business.
The customer and their relationship is central to business success. Do not rush to copy some competitors’ ways of caring for customers (e.g. automated telephone services!). Develop new ways to engage with customers in a way that customers want. They will repay you over and over. This is how Virgin took so much business away from the likes of Qantas

5. Treat internal employees as customers and friends.
The best innovation can come from co-operation between employees – this is an effective way of bringing out entrepreneurs. Identify and appoint innovation ‘champions’ around the business. These people will be the leaders on innovation development and manage the process. They must drive the culture.

6. Any function has scope for innovation – always.
HR, finance, customers service, manufacturing, legal, they all must innovate and an innovation culture that embraces all the functions will be a better joined up organisation.

7. Lead people to look externally for inspiration and don’t be afraid to steal other people’s ideas.
Some of the best ideas and simplest innovations are from businesses that already have had such a drive or survived times of stress. Don’t reinvent the wheel copy the world’s best practice then improve it.. Sometimes copying is the best route. However, copy it, and then improve it. Look at how the Japanese destroyed the UK motorcycle industry, they initially copied the UK and then made the products better.

8. Managers should promote external focus from all departments.
Many businesses suffer from internalism and parochialism. They stunt growth, innovation and sap energy. Assume that your business could be killed off by new entrants to the market or new innovations – people or technology based. Get people to think the un thinkable, develop thinking around scenarios that may seem unrealistic. In the 1960’s Black & Decker was the world’s largest and most trusted power tool maker. Which of the analysts and business commentators wrote or though in 2007 the major global banks would fail, that the system was unsupportable and a crash inevitable.

9. Lastly, companies must look forward, and by looking forward I mean 360 degree vision and a strategy to see through it. Most look back when setting budgets and design parameters.
Create a ‘can and will do’ rather than ‘can’t do’ culture. There are ‘no but’s’; only ‘yes and’

In the end, innovation is an state of mind. Train your key people to think and see differently, search every day for the new, the better, form, function, value and service. This is where Steve Jobs was masterful in transforming not only an industry which he had helped create but in transforming the culture of a major global enterprise.

The value of leadership and empowering your management is enormous and in truth no one has a choice in the matter. Everyone must adapt, change and innovate and we can all with training, help and enthusiasm become entrepreneurs.

Empowering employees to be innovative and creative, and encouraging a ‘can do’ attitude can reap rewards for everyone – whether monetary or reward based – and companies that do this are more likely to survive the recession.

A new show on the ABC called Redesign My Brain, hosted by Todd Samson, shows just how adaptable to new ideas, concepts and skills our brains are.

It’s been said so many times but the answer is to look out of the box or in more 21st century terms constantly look beyond the horizon and use 360 degree vision and thinking.

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with bite!

13 October 2003

http://wp.me/p401Wv-73

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