Marketing

All posts tagged Marketing

Creating an Entrepreneur - WCP 2013

Creating an Entrepreneur!

Is it possible….YES it is!

 

Entrepreneurs can be seen as the rocket fuel of new ideas, they create new businesses and form new industries and in common with such dangerous fuels entrepreneurs can occasionally end with an explosion, yet despite the occasional explosion we have to accept that entrepreneurs have driven commerce and commercial ideas forward for millennia.

Why are entrepreneurs and sound corporate management generally seen as oxymoronic? A commonly held corporate view is that entrepreneurs are too highly individual, unpredictable, difficult personalities and when it comes to team work and the subtleties of the office culture…..well perhaps it’s best not to go there!

Is this a fair view in today’s market or a historical carry over? Well perhaps it is time to re-assess, as entrepreneurs are changing and today’s business schools and universities are turning out business and law graduates with specific qualifications in entrepreneurship.

Having a brilliant, yet well rounded entrepreneur within a company could provide a much needed boost for most organisations. Imagine; a manager who embraces autonomy, who can not only see the problems but looks beyond to the solutions and the potential opportunities which can flow from the solutions.

A new generation of innovative and creative executives who can transform  ideas into profitable ventures. They strike the perfect balance – they look, act and think like entrepreneurs, but they work for the corporation. As any manager knows, such entrepreneurial team members are a rarity; however, this need not be the case.

Why not change your management culture to enable your future leaders to become more creative and entrepreneurial by developing a focused culture where innovation and creative thinking is encouraged, supported and of course rewarded.

One of the main problems facing many organisations is that they have lost sight of the importance of fostering creative thinking and innovation. They have become afraid of change and in doing so they are placing their business at risk and allowing their competition a valuable advantage.

Innovation should be seen as your ultimate corporate advantage and innovation springs from the minds of motivated and engaged employees, yes your entrepreneurs!

In the sixth century Sun Zu said “you may survive though defence but you can only win by attacking” and more recently Peter Drucker said “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.” Of course the most efficient and lasting method of attacking your competition is through marketing and innovation.

So what can your business do to be more competitive, to as Sun Zu recommends, “go on the attack?”

A decision to attack can filter down from the board through the CEO or an entrepreneurial culture within the organisation of creative thinking and visionary innovation can develop the strategy and sell it up the ladder.

Either route is possible but the latter will always deliver a better result.

A successful organisations culture inevitably stems from good leadership. This doesn’t mean that the board or the CEO have great ideas, they may have, but more importantly they create the environment in which managers are given the freedom and confidence to experiment and innovate. A management team encouraged to think and innovate will be motivated and will form a strong and positive corporate culture.

So how can we turn this into reality and create an entrepreneurial environment in your organisation? Here are my 7 steps to creating an entrepreneur:

  1. Create the environment. Ensure that management feel free and secure in scoping new ideas, in testing the established methods, in questioning and innovating at all levels and across all ideas. Allow for failures, if one out of ten ideas succeeds that’s probably a good trend line, eventually one of these ideas will boom!

  2. Thoroughly research and understand your customer and market needs and how well those needs are being met, look at how your organisation and products are perceived and then turn the table and examine your competitors. Equalling the value of competitive offerings is not going to “cut the mustard” if you want to win you must always ensure that you are leading the field in Marketing and Innovation and following through on customer service. Encourage your team to be bold, be different and be the best.

  3. Assume responsibility for your organisations cultural change and encourage and empower people to bring forward and implement their ideas and innovations.

  4. Support, learn from and work through the failures. If you get two or three successful new ideas and one absolute winner out of every ten pursued you are ahead of the trend line.

  5. Constantly strive to improve, to innovate and to lead, implement a strategy of marginal gains (The Power of Marginal Gains http://wp.me/p401Wv-di ) you will be surprised by the strength of results.

  6. Never underestimate your competitors, look at today’s automotive brands compared with those of 30 years ago. The industry initially laughed at Japan’s underpowered, small cars with floral carpets and upholstery but few would laugh today. Again Marketing & Innovation win!

  7. Your staff are outstandingly flexible and reliable assets to be deployed in the building of your business. Never see them as a cost, create an atmosphere of respect, treat employees as the rare and valuable resource they are and you will both reap the rewards of an exciting and vibrant corporate culture.

Some of the best ideas and simplest innovations are from businesses that already have had such a drive or survived times of stress. Don’t always look to reinvent the wheel, occasionally take the world’s best wheel and simply improve it. Sometimes copying is the best route forward, look at how the Japanese destroyed the UK motorcycle industry in the 1960’s and 70’s, they initially copied the UK machines and then introduced innovative and more advanced products.

 In the end, innovation is an state of mind. Train your key people to think and see differently, to search every day for the new, the better, form, function, value and service. This is where Steve Jobs was masterful in transforming not only an industry which he had helped create but in transforming the culture of a major global enterprise.

The value of leadership and empowering your management is enormous and in truth no one has a choice in the matter. Everyone must adapt, change and innovate and we can all with training, help and enthusiasm become entrepreneurs.

Empowering employees to be innovative and creative, and encouraging a ‘can do’ attitude can reap rewards for everyone – whether monetary or reward based – and companies that do this are more likely to survive the recession.

A recent show on the ABC called Redesign My Brain, hosted by Todd Samson, shows just how adaptable to new ideas, concepts and skills our brains are.

It has been said so many times but the answer is to constantly look beyond the horizon and use 360 degree vision and thinking.

 

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-gv

 www.wardourcapital.com

Logo Small wcp 2014

Perception - WCP 2014

Market Perception – What Do You See?

What do you see? It is an interesting question. Why? Because what you see is often being manipulated by a process known as “Perception Marketing”.

Perception Marketing has become big business and until recently I had applied little thought to the question of Perception versus Reality. People apparently now build entire careers around Perception Management, they are not involved in Product Development and Product Improvement, their mission in life involves changing us! Changing our Consumer Perception!

My regular readers are familiar with my commitment to Peter Drucker as the essential marketing guru. His definition of marketing is: – “to take something useful and turn it into something desirable”. I thought I understood this, yet recently I have encountered some surprising and lasting, examples of perception marketing driven desirability.

A couple of weeks ago I was having a product discussion with my son, the CEO of a US based FINTEC company, and I offered the opinion that the product (under discussion) was crap! He answered promptly, “I know that, you know that, but the market perception is different and the market perception is reality”.

At first I was disturbed by this, isn’t it wrong to sell a substandard product, even if the customer is satisfied?  Well let’s think again before we decide.In Maxx  Barry’s 1999 satirical novel on marketing, Soda & Cie, he writes that “Marketing’s first golden rule is that Perception is reality”

New Scientist magazine recently published an article describing how researchers at Harvard tested a new painkilling drug as well as placebos on migraine sufferers. The placebos, despite their lack of real painkilling ingredients, were remarkably effective. “The placebo… accounted for more than 50% of the drug effect,” the scientists found.

To most of us this is hardly news; drug trials routinely incorporate control groups who are given placebos to assist in identifying results that are outside the standard placebo effect. Other drug trials have shown that tiny placebo pills can have stronger effects than large ones because they are perceived as especially potent. Placebo colour can make a difference, too.

I had to ask myself are placebos “my crap” or “market reality”?

The lesson for marketers is that our experiences are shaped by our expectations

Do we have other examples of “placebo marketing”?

Until recently we had a substantial investment in the wine industry. Wine is the ideal product to illustrate how marketing perception affects consumer experience.

Most of us and even those within the industry don’t have the honed palate of a master of wine, and how we enjoy wine is heavily influenced by what we think we know about the wine.

Perception marketing experiments showed that the same wine thought by a taster to cost $45.00 rated better than when it was thought to cost $5.00. Not only was this a win for the perception marketers, it actually lit up a wider area within the pleasure centre of the taster’s brains. In other words the perception became reality, it really did taste better to them.

It’s an example of consumers really believing “You Get What You Pay For” – yet again Marketing Perception has trumped reality.

This brings me back to Peter Drucker’s quote. Desirability may not be a product of quality but of expectation.

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-fp

 

www.wardourcapital.com

Logo Small wcp 2014

Perception - WCP 2014

The Importance of Market Perception

Perception Marketing has become big business and until recently I had applied little thought to the question of Perception versus Reality. People apparently now build entire careers around Perception Management, they are not involved in Product Development and Product Improvement, their mission in life involves changing us! Changing our Consumer Perception!

My regular readers are familiar with my commitment to Peter Drucker as the essential marketing guru. His definition of marketing is: – “to take something useful and turn it into something desirable”. I believed I understood this, yet recently I have encountered some surprising and strangely lasting, examples of perception marketing driven desirability.

A couple of weeks ago I was having a product discussion with my son, the CEO of a US based FINTEC company, and I offered the opinion that the product (under discussion) was crap! He answered promptly, “I know that, you know that, but the market perception is different and the market perception is reality”.

At first I was disturbed by this, isn’t it wrong to sell a substandard product, even if the customer is satisfied?  Well let’s think again before we decide.

New Scientist magazine recently published an article describing how researchers at Harvard tested a new painkilling drug as well as placebos on migraine sufferers. The placebos, despite their lack of real painkilling ingredients, were remarkably effective. “The placebo… accounted for more than 50% of the drug effect,” the scientists found.

To most of us this is hardly news; drug trials routinely incorporate control groups who are given placebos to assist in identifying results that are outside the standard placebo effect. Other drug trials have shown that tiny placebo pills can have stronger effects than large ones because they are perceived as especially potent. Placebo colour can make a difference, too.

I had to ask myself are placebos “my crap” or “market reality”?

The lesson for marketers is that our experiences are shaped by our expectations

Do we have other examples of “placebo marketing”?

Until recently we had a substantial investment in the wine industry. Wine is the ideal product to illustrate how marketing perception affects consumer experience.

Most of us and even those within the industry don’t have the honed palate of a master of wine, and how we enjoy wine is heavily influenced by what we think we know about the wine.

Perception marketing experiments showed that the same wine thought by a taster to cost $45.00 rated better than when it was thought to cost $5.00. Not only was this a win for the perception marketers, it actually lit up a wider area within the pleasure centre of the taster’s brains. In other words the perception became reality, it really did taste better to them.

It’s an example of consumers really believing “You Get What You Pay For” – yet again Marketing Perception has trumped reality.

This brings me back to Peter Drucker’s quote. Desirability may not be a product of quality but of expectation.

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SMS Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-eC

 

www.wardourcapital.com

Logo Small wcp 2014

Business-development

5 Tips for Business SUCCESS!

 

1.       Business Development Is Not Increasing Sales

Managing the development of your business has a lot in common with conducting an orchestra. It’s a case of encouraging and leading the various differing components of your business forward, in harmony, to the same point at the same time to produce an extraordinary effect. You need to develop your unique product or service to meet the highest level of customer expectations and you must do so at a price representing fair value and at a cost which generates a fair profit.

2.       Understanding profit does not equal cash

Profitable businesses fail every day. Many small business owners chase growth and revenues forgetting the basic facts of cash management. Profit equals Revenue – Costs but until you have received payment you are in a cash negative position. Ideally you would ensure that you have sufficient cash reserves to meet three to six months of costs. In the early days of a business keep fixed expenses as low as possible, use a virtual office and work from home if possible, keep full time staff to a minimum, pay cash or do without non-essential plant and equipment. This helps if you have a quiet month or even two.

3.       Intuition Versus Fact

Don’t build a business around a product or service you like or you would buy. Undertake sound quantitative research to determine what your prospective customers want and buy then see if you can develop an even better product or service at a price they are prepared to pay. Don’t be tempted to compete on price alone. If company A has been making its product for many years and you realise you could source and sell that product at a good profit for less that’s a good value proposition to you not your customer. The market is less willing to change supply on price alone but if you can offer a better value/service proposition where they get a better product and improved customer service you will have a much greater chance of success.

4.       Business & Financial Planning

There is an old saying “if you don’t know what you want you will probably never get it” and that’s certainly the case in business. A well thought through and documented business plan outlining your core objectives, market analysis, product development, marketing strategies and detailed financial budgets is essential. This is an area where you should consider the use of a mentor or an external consultant to help you get it right. Your financial plan should include linked budgets for P&L, Cash Flow and Balance Sheets. A beautifully bound business plan kept on a shelf is a waste of space it has to be a living breathing document understood and read regularly, reported against monthly and the strategies varied as needed to meet your actual versus budgeted position.

5.       Respect all Stakeholders

 A successful entrepreneur understands that the stakeholders in a business are not just the shareholders. The stakeholders include employees, suppliers, customers, shareholders and advisors and they are vital to the success of failure of your business. Spend time with each stakeholder, respect them, listen to their ideas, take their ideas, discuss your plans and your position with them. Take them on your journey as partners. Keep them honestly and openly informed and they will join your team and give you their full support. Again many businesses fail because they don’t earn the respect and support of their stakeholders. Building a successful company is hardit requires a lot of commitment and courage as well as a little luck and of course having a great product and team. Watching your idea become a product and a product generate revenue that becomes a successful company makes it all worthwhile. Working with your stakeholders and mentors, following and constantly updating your plans and finances will go a long way to ensuring success.

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-ao

Marketing Redefined WCP 2013

Marketing Redefined

Think, Change, Grow, Prosper!

 

In the dark distant past when coffee came without froth and computers were kept in sealed rooms and operated by bespectacled men (sorry ladies its true) in white coats, I spent a few years climbing the corporate ladder which included a stop off in the Marketing Department of a major multi-national.

We saw marketing in aggressively military terms of war, battles, and campaigns, all fine-tuned through tactics, strategy and whiskey.

Statistics and information was gathered from the market and analysed, products were designed, costed, tested, refined, manufactured, advertised and sold, hopefully, at a profit.

Much thought and combative discussion was applied at each stage, key objectives were established, strategic marketing plans, short term tactics, placement attacks and budgets were drawn up and approved before being committed to endless reams of paper. Weekly meetings were held to gauge progress and we wrote up even more notes in pencil before dictating them to our “girl”, sorry PA, to be typed up.

Much time and efficiency was lost in the process and very few really great ideas came out of it.

When I attend marketing meetings today the mood is less combative and the whiskey has unfortunately disappeared  yet I fear just as much time and efficiency is being lost in the discussion of SEO’s, word place rankings, the placement of hash tags and how well the product will look on mobile devices. I leave the room bored and just a little concerned that no one is actually marketing the product.

Perhaps it’s time to redefine MARKETING.

“Marketing is too important to be left to the marketing department.”

– David Packard, co-founder, Hewlett-Packard

When you own the show you can make such bold statements! However, if we ask any ten business leaders today to define marketing we will probably get ten different answers. Marketing its function and its purpose appear to have entered a management grey zone.

I was fortunate some years ago to meet the father of modern management, Peter Drucker, on a number of occasions and his view was: “Because the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two – and only two – basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing is the distinguishing, unique function of the business.”

So, what is marketing and are we moving closer to a definition? The Silicon Valley venture capitalist and former Intel executive Bill Davidow said, harking back to warfare, “Marketing must invent complete products and drive them to commanding positions in defensible market segments.” The man should know. He wrote the seminal book on high-tech marketing.

Interestingly Davidow didn’t learn marketing at university as he studied electrical engineering. Steve Jobs, another brilliant marketer, dropped out of school. These guys and others like them demonstrate that great marketing skills can be developed.

So how do great marketers learn about marketing? I am convinced that great marketing skills are best learnt on the job. Doing the hard yards.

SME’s and Startup companies are great places to learn and develop marketing skills because they’re all about developing innovative products and getting customer traction – and not much else. Further they’re always strapped for cash and needing people to wear multiple hats.

Interestingly as an engineer by training I also learnt marketing on the job.

Its been a long and complex journey but here are THE SIX KEY LESSONS  I learnt along the way:

Marketing is Hard.

It has been said that “Marketing is like sex: Everyone thinks they’re good at it”. Well I’m not getting into that one but on observation there are more posers in marketing than most other fields, probably because the demand is so strong and the supply of real talent is so weak, and it’s easy to fake. When discussing a Telco acquisition with an American banker some years ago he started to tell me how the marketing model needed to change. When challenged he answered “Bankers like to think that they are marketing geniuses. We really do.” He said, this is because “we can fake it far more convincingly than in other areas …” It’s worrying but it’s out there, be warned.

Understand People.

It’s about determining what customers want, often before they know it themselves – look at Sushi-Sushi and how they got everyone eating raw fish. If you’ve got a knack for that sort of thing, trust it. Be your own focus group of one. And while it’s tempting to think of markets as amorphous virtual entities, remember that, even in the B2B world, every product is purchased by a human being in the real world.

Marketers don’t reinvent the wheel.

Some people are great inventors. They come up with wild concepts that nobody’s ever thought of. But great marketers tend to be innovators who turn inventions into things people can use. Marketing thrives on reusing ideas in new ways. Most modern Japanese industry was based on this premise. Steve Jobs didn’t invent he moulded inventions into products people wanted to use.

Marketing is too important to leave to the marketing department.

It really is! Marketing is the hub of the business wheel. It’s where product development, manufacturing, finance, communications, and sales all meet. Marketing’s stakeholders are every critical function in the company. Every member of the leadership team is an adjunct of the marketing department. SME or Giant Corporation it’s all the same.

Marketing Really Counts.

Contrary to today’s popular feel-good wisdom, in business, winning is everything. Every transaction has one buyer and one seller. If you do it right, buyer and seller both win. All the other would-be sellers lose. The real world is brutally competitive. Be different to win.

Great Marketing Ideas are Rare.

By executing the right communication strategy, great marketers can create a groundswell of customer excitement and viral demand for a company or product that nobody’s ever heard of. And it can be done on a shoestring budget. Steve Jobs was a master at maintaining secrecy and controlling exactly how and when anybody learned anything about Apple’s products. MacDonald’s are turning bad press about fast food into selling points through its new menus and PR.

The truth is that great marketers are few and far between. Which begs the question, who exactly are you trusting the most important aspect of your business to? Something for you to think about as you take your SME global.

Finally my definition of marketing is to “take something useful and turn it into something desirable”

 Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://www.neilsteggall.org

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p401Wv-9O