“success”

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Seven steps to getting rich  

Nest of Riches - WCP 2014

The accumulation of wealth is easier than most realise. Once your antenna is raised to embrace wealth potential and you commence the journey riches will follow. In recent times wealth and its creation have been seen as less than desirable perhaps even a little dirty, not quite the done thing.

I find this attitude strange as throughout nature creatures nest and those capable of building a better nest live longer, breed more successfully and generally enhance their bloodlines and community. Surely that’s a good outcome for all?

Wealth and its creation should not be considered ‘dirty words’, but remember the discrete and careful enjoyment of its benefits are attributes to be admired. True wealth is a state of mind and an ongoing way of living which embraces so much more than your bank balance.

As with so much in life a steady, incremental plan, will deliver a surer chance of success in the creation of wealth. Yes it is slower than “doing the great deal” but it is also more certain in outcome and you will have more chance of holding onto and enjoying the wealth you create.

It doesn’t matter how much you earn, whether you are a Gen Y first time investor or a seasoned baby boomer with multiple assets, there are seven key strategic behaviours that set apart the wealthy from the rest of us.

  1. Spend less than you earn – this sounds obvious but many of us live from pay cheque to pay cheque, which indicates it’s a lesson that is quickly forgotten. Save and invest because the law of compound interest will help ensure your nest egg grows quickly. Start as soon as possible because time is your best friend.

  2. Invest as much as you can in assets whose underlying capital value will grow – remembering income is usually taxed at a higher rate than capital growth.

  3. Reinvest any capital growth – as this adds to the amazing power of compound growth.

  4. Do not be afraid of debt – leverage accelerates your net worth but keep a suitable buffer for the unexpected.

  5. Invest in yourself – it pays to broaden your fundamental investment knowledge.

  6. Have a mentor – a coach will help drive you and keep you focused on your long-term goals.

  7. Have a team of experts – remember you don’t have to be the smartest person in your team.

Above all, generating wealth is about having a purpose and focused determination. We are all living longer and will need more wealth to look after ourselves when we are older. State pensions are no longer the safety net they once were and advances in medical research keep us healthier for longer, but at a cost.

Start today by determining how much wealth you want to hold and by which dates. Write a game plan detailing how you are going to achieve wealth, refer to it daily and update it regularly as change occurs. The sooner you start the easier it is!

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By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-j2

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Leadership

5 Traits of a Great Leader

Leadership is an extraordinary skill so much so that it is often difficult to define that certain something which differentiates the great from a good leader.

 When assessing investment opportunities we always look at the leadership first and foremost, particularly in start-ups. To guide us we have developed the 5 Key Trait test. It is rare to find all of the traits in one person but when we do we know we have a winner.

 So what are the 5 Key Traits?

 1. Simplicity of Vision.

Einstein once said that if a theory couldn’t be explained simply it was probably false and much the same can be said of a business. A leader needs to convince investors, employees, bankers and customers that their vision is sound and each person needs to be able to understand, believe in and take that vision on board the first time they hear it. This sounds simple but it it’s not, indeed it is extremely rare, most leaders become bogged down in detail and blur the vision.

 2. Persistence.

An exceptional leader is motivated, single minded and above all persistent. We look for leaders who when knocked down get up and get back on track. Taking Churchill’s advice they “Never, Never, Never, Give Up.”

In today’s competitive and constantly challenging business environment the great leader quickly recognises potential corporate risks or opportunities, assesses the situation and develops strategies to move forward. This style of entrepreneur isn’t a talker they are doers and they deliver.

 3. Focus.

It is so easy to be distracted when managing a dynamic, growing business, as CEO you are deluged with ideas about finance, marketing, stakeholders and more. It takes extraordinary courage and focus to identify the small number of key actions which absolutely must be completed for the greater good of the venture, to stick with those actions and to complete them perfectly.

The more focused a leader is the more comfortable we are in believing this person can and will deliver results.

4. Culture.

Again a great leader understands and manages the value of culture. They care about the details which build corporate culture and brands; they manage those details because intuitively they know the importance of the seemingly small in building large. You can never be too important to let go of this detail. Look as Steve Jobs and Apple, how he micro managed form and function to build culture, brand and following. Those small details became the definition of his corporation.

 5. Magnetism.

Great corporations are built by great leaders who build the strongest teams. A great leader, supported by a strong team will always succeed. To attract the best people to a business, prospective employees need to believe in its leadership, to want to work within it, to help share and build the vision. To achieve this a great leader needs a special charisma, something we call magnetism.

Leadership is complex and ever changing but understanding these 5 Key Traits has proved helpful to our company when identifying great leadership.

By, Neil Steggall

 The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

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Who is.....WCP 2014

Don’t F*** With Your Business. Plan For Success.

I apologise for the title, but I see so many smart people with so many great ideas fail to make the grade and do you know why? They simply fail to develop and implement an effective business plan.

In my experience in leading dozens of business planning workshops across the world, I’d say only around 10% to 15% of the small to mid-cap teams I’ve encountered have an effective business planning process.

Why is this? Why do so many business owners fail to understand that good planning equals good management and that in turn, builds a great business? Am I missing something here? Can it truly be such a hard concept to sell, so hard for a burgeoning entrepreneur to grasp that a sound business plan could secure their future?

So back to the title……simply put it reflects my sense of frustration!

It’s not hard; business planning is about managing resources and priorities in an organized way. It is a function of leadership, and good leadership and management is directly related to productivity.

How can we fix this?

Well here are three very easy steps to help get you planning and, in turn, improve your management, productivity and performance.

1. Write a plan. Many business plans are written to look good and impress investors, banks and other external parties. What we are looking at here is a simple document designed purely to help you as the business owner manage better. Start simply and just jot down the essential points of your business as bullet points, tables, and short explanations. The strategy element of planning is to focus  on  where you want to be, what you’re good at, what matters to you, which people are most important to you and what you can do for them. It’s about positioning, determining your target market and product focus.

It’s important to write these details down in order to commit to your vision and to communicate your vision to close stakeholders such as employees. If you don’t have a team, there’s value in being able to refer back to your original thoughts and ideas for your business and to compare them to your actual results.

2. Set Milestones. In order to check your progress, define and then include your long-term goals. Think in general terms about how you see your business developing over the next three years.

From there, get specific. You’ll want to establish milestones for when you want to accomplish certain goals, and know who you will want to carry them out. Go beyond sales, costs and expenses, and look at what really drives your business. It might be conversions, page views, clicks, meals, trips, presentations, seminars and other engagements.

Then, establish a review schedule — when you and your team review changed assumptions, track results and make changes as necessary.

3. Implement Your Plan. Involve your team and encourage ownership of ideas. Tracking and analysing numbers can help you manage the work behind the numbers. You’ll be in a better place to recognize and highlight what’s working and what isn’t working for your business and your team.

Suppose enquiry is up, but conversions are down or revenues are up but margins down. You collect your data, review it with your team and develop a plan to make changes toward reaching your goals. That’s management.

Managing your business successfully requires more than just praise and pats on the back. Sometimes it means focusing attention on problems, helping people solve them if possible, discussing and embracing mistakes, and, in the worst case, weeding out people who don’t care about bad results. This can all be accomplished more efficiently when you have a plan in place.

Related article: – The Power of Marginal Gains |  http://wp.me/p401Wv-di 

Either way, whether results are better than expected or worse, the planning and tracking makes your follow up easier. The process itself adds commitment and peer pressure to the team. Highlighting good performance is easier when there are agreed-on numbers to define it. And, probably most important, dealing with poor performance is always hard, but not quite as hard when you can focus on the specific numbers instead of personalities or office politics.

Which brings me back to where I began: Planning is management. Without planning, your management is at a real disadvantage.

Neil Steggall

Barking Mad with Neil Steggall

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A Paradox - WCP 2014

The Business Planning Paradox 

Some years ago I sat on the Australian board of a major US consumer goods company when the news came through that our regional boss in the US had retired and was been replaced by a newly retired US Army General with no business experience – imagine our misgivings!

Our new boss, let’s call him “Bud” arrived in Australia three weeks later to sit in on the presentation of our revised and much changed 5 Year Strategic Plan. He sat patiently through two days of presentations, projections, detail and the final summary asking pertinent questions and seemingly agreeing with our logic and direction.

On the third day, in our windowless board room, he kicked off the questioning by asking me “Son, how much faith do you personally have in this plan, would you bet your career on it?” I was confident in our team’s research, logic and the plan presented so I answered in the affirmative with: I am confident Bud and yes I would bet my career!

“Son I am saddened because you must be a lot dumber than I was thinking” was Bud’s response!

This was a bit of a downer to say the least. Bud continued:-

“Son I served in supply in Vietnam can you imagine starting your day at 5.00am not knowing where your troops were going that day, or how many would be alive or wounded that night, but knowing that wherever they were they needed mess tents and hot food, field hospitals, beds, fuel, ammunition, and vehicles to replace the damaged ones and if I let them down I let America down”

“Now Son my enemy was a lot harder to handle than your “competitors” so how helpful would a 5 day plan never mind 5 years have been to me?”

I assumed this was a rhetorical question and asked Bud just how he did plan his supply chain – I was incidentally impressed by the complexity of his logistics.

Bud’s response was to answer “Son I’m asking the questions today so let me ask you this; how far can you turn your head to each side?” around 90° each way, I answered, about 180° in total. “And how far can you lift and lower your head?” mmm, around 90° degrees each way “BULLSHIT!” he roared “you are very lucky if you can get a true 170° and let me tell you problems  will come at you from 360° and spherically so better be prepared!”

I may have made Bud sound like a difficult character, he wasn’t, he was different and we became friends and remained so for many years.

He had developed his famous 4 point plan to “Succeed in Everything” and here is the paradox: it was potentially an 8 Point plan! Let me explain:-

“The 4 point Plan to Succeed in everything”

RULE 1:

a)      Develop  a detailed written plan

b)      Don’t be too “stuck” to your plan

RULE 2:

a)      Calculate, Calibrate & Measure everything

b)      Don’t be bound by numbers, always look beyond

RULE 3:

a)      Constantly seek information, input and advice from others

b)      Follow your own heart & instincts

RULE: 4

a)      Delegate wherever possible

b)      Always retain control

Developing a detailed plan of where you want to be and how you plan to get there is to me absolutely essential to good management. Done well it involves bringing the whole team together to focus on the challenges and opportunities facing the organisation and the plans progressive development forces you and your team to think through each point, to question, determine and build a strong team vision.

 Don’t be too “sticky”! I like to think of a plan as a road map to guide us from point A to point Z, a very useful document without which many long journeys would fail. However if along the journey a bridge has collapsed or the mountain pass is blocked by a slide we have to put the map to one side and handle the blockage. So it is with business plans!

Calculating & Calibrating:  Peter Drucker said “What’s measured improves” and I am a huge Drucker fan. I am a bit of a numbers nut, I find spreadsheets akin to soothing pictures; when I sit down to review a business I enjoy dissecting the market, the innovation, the competition, the costs, expenses, cash flows and projections…….they can all be reduced to numbers and measured.

There is also a common corporate condition known as “Analysis Paralysis” this is the stage at which you can no longer see the wood for the trees. KPI’s are great but they can hide the bigger picture, so step back occasionally and look beyond the numbers – you may be surprised by what you see.

Seeking information, input and advice from others has long been a hallmark of good leadership and a strong indicator of an organisations culture and attitude. Until we strive fully understand every aspect of the market in which we operate, our relative position within it, our products relative positions within it, our financial position within it and the markets overall direction, wants and needs we are operating an incomplete structure, perhaps one lacking a vital component.

 A strong CEO or leader asks many questions in meetings or planning sessions but is careful in placing forward their views; they listen to, consider and weigh the advice, they read through the detail of market and financial analysis and then make an effective decision based upon their experience and their heart or gut instinct. This is what makes them leaders.

Delegation is another common denominator of strong leaders. Delegation not only provides leaders with more time to lead but it empowers subordinates whilst building their leadership and the organisations culture. It’s a wonderful, internal win-win!

A really good leader delegates on an 80/20 principle which I call “Loose, Tight, Management”. In effect 80% of decisions are safe, that is if the wrong decision is made it’s not life threatening to the Corporation but 20% of decisions are crucial and by keeping control over this 20% you always retain control of the whole.

A strong leader never criticises a poor decision or a failure arising out of delegation, these are valuable lessons for subordinates and each lesson well-handled builds the person and enhances the corporate culture.

The lesson I took from Bud was that there are few if any absolutes in an ever changing world and that the key to good planning is to understand exactly where you want to be whilst retaining the flexibility and the ability to change to adapt to changed needs and conditions.

The lesson was well taught and conveyed and as a consequence planning improved, I improved and the corporation improved and that is what “A Plan to Succeed in Everything” should deliver.

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-gz

 www.wardourcapital.com

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3 Short Steps to Success 

3 Short Steps to Success - WCP 2014

Some years ago, a small number of our organisations global executives, myself included,  met in Buenos Aires to engage in an intimate three day intensive workshop with a “management guru” who was at that time considered to be one of the world’s greatest “thinkers”.

This was my second session with this guy in 18 months and I knew he would drive us hard and along unconventional routes. On the second day and without warning he asked “Neil take a pad and paper into the interview room and over the next 30 minutes prepare in as few words as you can, a presentation on  – what you need to be a success – you have to be fully prepared to discuss and defend your theory on your return”……WOW!

Shaken and nervous I found myself 45 minutes later presenting for the first time my “3 Short Steps to Success”.

I hear you ask: “Can it really be so easy as to define a path to Success in 3 Short Steps?”

Yes. I believe it can. I believe I later used this 3 Short Steps to Success method to achieve my first real “non-corporate business success” and I believe you can use it too. The lesson I was taught in Buenos Aires is that often the simple path is best.

Note I used the word believe three times in the previous sentence. It’s not bad writing or bad editing its positive discrimination, more on belief later.

There are three core common factors in achieving anything of significance be it in sporting, academic, professional or business arenas.

THE VISION:

“Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning. –Gloria Steinem”

If you know what you want to achieve, if you can close your eyes and envisage it, taste it, feel it then you are already well along the first step to success. You don’t have to know the detail but you need to understand on a subconscious level where you are going.

I am sure Ray Kroc didn’t wake up one morning and say “hey I am going to build the world’s largest burger chain today”. But I am sure that as an American of Czech origin he knew he wanted his part of the American dream and that dream was something, a vision or dream, he carried with him every moment of every day.

The Success Vision you develop is about your destination rather than the journey. To a large extent your destination will determine the journey.

The first important step is to envisage that destination because if you don’t know where you are going you will probably never arrive!

THE BELIEF:

“Believe you can and you’re halfway there. –Theodore Roosevelt” 

Once you have developed the vision you have to develop the belief in your ability to complete the journey, to follow that vision through to journeys end.

Part of building belief is to break the journey down in your mind into manageable chunks, to start to fill out your vision, understand it and believe in it implicitly.

Essentially you have determined where you are going and you have to train yourself, body, mind and soul to reach that end point.

We each train our bodies and minds in different ways. In this example we are reinforcing our belief in a vision of our making. Quite a task but by imagining scenarios, dreaming, thinking through our vision that vision starts to become reality and when that happens you develop a belief in your vision and your vision starts to become reality.

THE PERISCOPE:

“Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture the heart. – Ancient Indian Proverb”

Once you have locked in Vision and Belief the journey begins and the specifics of how success is going to be achieved come into play.

When I first started speaking on the 3 Steps to Success I used the phrase “Keeping  Your Periscope Up”  to describe a subconscious search that would be constantly scanning the horizon to  highlight the occasional “blips” of potential opportunity.

Imagine as you go about your day to day business carrying your vision and belief whilst the “Periscope” of your mind is scanning the horizon and filtering the signals to uncover opportunity.  Over a number of years this “Periscope & Filter” approach has thrown up for me many more quality opportunities than I have found or devised brainstorming in the office or any other method.

Let’s return to Ray Kroc once again. Do you think when in 1954 as a kitchen equipment salesman he wandered into the MacDonald brothers store in San Bernardino, California thinking of buying it? No. But he had his Vision and he had self-belief and his periscope radar “pinged” loudly..

His had been a long, tough, journey, he was 52 years old and yet his periscope was up and operating. The fact that this small burger store was so popular as to need 8 new “multi-mixers” started him thinking, the fact that the store was so efficient fed that thought process and his Vision saw a chain of burger outlets.

Never lose sight of the fact that success is many things to many people. A good friend of mine was an acclaimed AFL player for a major team yet he never played in a Grand Final. I asked one day how he felt about that and he said “every time I walked onto the ground and heard our supporters roar, I couldn’t believe I was so lucky or so proud. Win lose or draw I was doing what I had dreamt of”.

This is success. My friend later enjoyed a successful off field business career and now he throws his still considerable energy into chairing a not for profit organisation. A successful life lived well.

Two favourite quotes of mine which have relevance here are:

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity”. –Amelia Earhart

Limitations live only in our minds.  But if we use our imaginations, our possibilities become limitless.” –Jamie Paolinetti

 

By, Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

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www.wardourcapital.com

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Winning WCP 2013

The Power of Marginal Gains

I first heard of the power of marginal gains as a student. Back then “the power” of ideas such as marginal gains, marginal pricing,  marginal costing, marginal probability and compound interest were all being used in business studies to show how something didn’t have to be “wiz, bang, new, fast and you beaut” to make a difference. It was power man!

Compounding interest has continued to fascinate me and occasionally I while away the odd hour on Excel running compounding options. Truly fascinating…..really! The largest deal I ever closed was when as a young executive I convinced the board of a major American company to supply us on the basis of marginal costing.

Recently on a quiet Saturday (I know it’s sad) I googled “The Power of Marginal Gains” expecting to find a plethora of MBA theses on the subject but instead I found page after page of British cycling triumphs and a guy called Dave Brailsford – Now Sir Dave all thanks to his marginal gains!

British Cycling…….Why?

No British cyclist had ever won the Tour de France, but as the new General Manager and Performance Director for Team Sky (Great Britain’s professional cycling team), that’s what Brailsford was asked to do.

His approach was simple.

Brailsford believed in a concept that he referred to as the “aggregation of marginal gains.” He explained it as the “1 percent margin for improvement in everything you do.” His belief was that if you improved every area related to cycling by just 1 percent, then those small gains would add up to remarkable improvement.

They started by optimizing the things you might expect: the nutrition of riders, their weekly training program, the ergonomics of the bike seat, and the weight of the tires.

But Brailsford and his team didn’t stop there. They searched for 1 percent improvements in tiny areas that were overlooked by almost everyone else: discovering the pillow that offered the best sleep and taking it with them to hotels, testing for the most effective type of massage gel, and teaching riders the best way to wash their hands to avoid infection. They searched for 1 percent improvements everywhere.

Brailsford believed that if they could successfully execute this strategy, then Team Sky would be in a position to win the Tour de France in five years’ time.

He was wrong. They won it in three years.

In 2012, Team Sky rider Sir Bradley Wiggins became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France. That same year, Brailsford coached the British cycling team at the 2012 Olympic Games and dominated the competition by winning 70 percent of the gold medals available.

In 2013, Team Sky repeated their feat by winning the Tour de France again, this time with rider Chris Froome. Many have referred to the British cycling feats in the Olympics and the Tour de France over the past 10 years as the most successful run in modern cycling history.

And now for the important question: what can we learn from Brailsford’s approach?

The Aggregation of Marginal Gains

It’s so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making better decisions on a daily basis.

Almost every habit that you have — good or bad — is the result of many small decisions over time.

And yet, how easily we forget this when we want to make a change.

So often we convince ourselves that change is only meaningful if there is some large, visible outcome associated with it. Whether it is losing weight, building a business, travelling the world or any other goal, we often put pressure on ourselves to make some earth-shattering improvement that everyone will talk about.

Meanwhile, improving by just 1 percent isn’t notable (and sometimes it isn’t even noticeable). But it can be just as meaningful, especially over time.

And from what I can tell, this pattern works the same way in reverse (in other words an aggregation of marginal losses) a 1 percent decline here and there — that eventually leads to a problem.

In the beginning, there is basically no difference between making a choice that is 1% better or 1% worse. (In other words, it won’t impact you very much today.) But as time goes on, these small improvements or declines compound and you suddenly find a very big gap between people who make slightly better decisions on a daily basis and those who don’t. This is why small choices (“I’ll take fries with that”) don’t make much of a difference at the time, but add up over a period.

The Bottom Line

Success is a few simple disciplines, practised every day; while failure is simply a few errors in judgement, repeated every day.

Most people love to talk about success (and life in general) as an event. We talk about losing 50 pounds or building a successful business as if they are events. But the truth is that most of the significant things in life aren’t stand-alone events, but rather the sum of all the moments when we chose to do things 1 percent better or 1 percent worse. Aggregating these marginal gains makes a difference.

There is enormous power in small steady wins. This is why the tortoise usually beats the rabbit, the system is greater than the goal.

Where are the 1 percent improvements in your life?

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite

http://wp.me/p401Wv-di

www.wardourcapital.com

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True Success - WCP 2014

SUCCESS!!! Can everyone succeed?

Have you ever gone along to one of those meetings where only as you arrive do you realise the objective is to recruit you into Multi-Level Marketing? ……I have.

At first analysis the system is fool proof. Follow the program, build your team, sell some product and you are going to be rich and successful!

It demonstrates the simplicity of applied logic and the leveraging of numbers; and yet…….less than 1 in 1,000 recruits are successful.

Basically the MLM system fails to deliver because it is a numbers game dependent upon you being the possessor of a hide thicker than an elephants. It requires exacting teamwork from a large number of disparate people each with a differing view of “their” business and differing needs and wants.

The logic fails the humanity test.

Click on any social media site or online magazine today and you are overwhelmed by articles and ads offering SUCCESS in 1,2,3 or 5 simple steps. Do these programs work?

I may well lose friends and totally fail to influence people here but I think most of this is poppycock and hype. Sheer unadulterated psychobabble perpetrated by the need to fill space and the never ending need of people to hear their own voice or see their name in print. And yes don’t rush off to check…..I have in the past written the 5 Key Steps to…..etc. I am now maturing!

All right…..send your email now signed “Disgruntled and Disgusted” of ……..(enter suburb).

Let’s step back a little and consider the early management advice of one of my key influencers and a true management guru, Peter Drucker. He really thought deeply about business and business success. One can gauge the very depth of his thinking by his brevity of words and his no nonsense common sense, I offer a few simple Drucker quotes below:-

  1. “The purpose of business is to create and keep a customer.”

  2.  “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.”

  3. “What’s measured improves”

  4. “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.”

  5. “Until we can manage time, we can manage nothing else.”

  6.  “Success comes to those who know themselves – their strengths, their values, and how they best perform.”

It was hard to choose these six almost primitively simple Drucker quotes as they were chosen from around 300 Drucker quotes collected on my computer. Each quote deserves contemplation and through contemplation will provide an essential element of management.

Each quote hints at and leads the mind to see the larger plan behind and excitingly that unfolding image will be as powerful, as functional and yet different to each one of us.

In my mind his thinking reduces management to its core componentry, there are no new Emperors Clothes on promise here.

So what is SUCCESS? Let’s look first at what it is not. It is not big cars, big spending, private jets, corporate jaunts and attractive sexy partners; they are life style choices.

SUCCESS is achieving your own goals or your own objectives. If you set out to complete task (a) today, when finished you have succeeded. In Drucker’s mind the 6 quotes above would when understood and implemented represent 6 huge successes which, as a whole would represent a far greater, lasting, collective success.

SUCCESS is not the destination it is the culmination of the hundreds, possibly thousands of small successes you achieve along the journey. As with any great structure designed and built intelligently and with care the end result is always stronger and more resilient than its constituent parts. This is SUCCESS.

Can everyone succeed? No. Business requires certain personality traits and a good deal of skill, vision, courage, determination, stress and complexity. This is more than some people want or can handle.

Certainly through start up almost every business is a very hot kitchen to be in! To not have the desire or the personality to run a business is not a failure it is a simple fact.

Where does this leave us? In my opinion with four critical attributes (yes I know!) you can probably succeed in business:-

  • A sound product or service

  • Confidence in yourself and your vision

  • A written business plan including objectives, marketing and basic financials which you measure the business against

  • Absolute guts, determination and a preparedness for hard work

Perhaps business success really comes down to that final dot point!

By: Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bC

www.wardourcapital.com

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e Business WCP 2014

HELP!! – SME’s: need “e-business!”

To be “in the right place at the right time” is always seen as paramount to winning the lottery. Unfortunately most of us only realise later that we had been in the place and time doing nothing in particular.

Training and assisting SME’s in understanding the wide range of computing, internet and social media options now open to them is huge. It’s a huge opportunity because a real yet solvable problem exists today and the statistics suggest those SME’s who don’t acquire and use the skills will not be around in 5 years.

In 1995 when the first Sensis e-Business Report was published 91 per cent of SME’s surveyed had heard of the internet, but few were connected or had any intention of connecting, with two-thirds of those not intending to connect saying that they could not see a business benefit for it!

Only five per cent were connected and just over a quarter of those surveyed did not have a computer. In fact the biggest technological talking point at the time was the fax machine.

The 2013 Sensis e-business report showed the enormity of the change in internet use. Not surprisingly, 98 per cent of SMEs now have a computer, with a fast-rising 69 per cent (up 10 per cent since 2012) having a notebook computer and 41 per cent owning tablets. Internet connectivity increased over the previous 12 months from 92 per cent to 96 per cent, and 26 per cent of those with a connection intending to get a faster connection within the next year.

Sensis also found that 68 per cent of small business owners have smartphones and, on average, they spend $6,200 annually on technology hardware and $4400 on software.

That’s some change in just less than two decades. However, the first thing SMEs need to realise is that while technology is enabling the change, it is actually the customers who are driving it.

While Sensis have been researching SMEs’ adoption and attitudes towards technology since 1995, they extended the research to include the general population in 2005.

The 2013 Sensis e-Business report showed that 91 per cent of Australians have a computer and 96 percent use the internet. And, when asked about their usage of the internet, the most popular activity was ‘looked for information on products and services’ (87 per cent of all Australians), followed by ‘looked for suppliers of products and services’ (82 per cent), with ‘paying for purchases or bills’ (78 per cent) and ‘ordering goods/services’ (74 per cent) also being prominent.

So the stats are telling us that people are using the internet to search for and purchase products. So if SMEs want to connect with potential customers they need to be easily found in the places people are looking.

Consequently, a digital presence will become essential for all successful SMEs. At present, 66 per cent of SMEs have a website and 72 per cent of those reported increased business effectiveness through the platform. We predict the number of SMEs with websites to increase as a result.

As with websites, it is inevitable that the use of social media will increase rapidly as SMEs better understand the benefits and imperatives of close customer interaction. The social media revolution makes the possibility of customer engagement almost an expectation: people increasingly want to comment on their experience – either through praise or pillory – and if the business does not have a social media outlet for that interaction then the customer may find another outlet where the business does not have the opportunity to directly engage.

Mobility is another reality that SMEs are slowly coming to terms with. With mobility, businesses are less connected to the physical location so business becomes an activity, rather than an address. SME’s are slow to adapt to technologies which could save or earn them more money.

As an example, in the days before Christmas we changed the flyscreens in our house. The contractor had been out some weeks earlier to take measurements and the price was agreed. After fitting the screens the contractor said that will be $x thank you, it was the agreed price and I reached for my debit card to pay. “Oh I only take cash” was his comment. It’s a long time since I carried that much cash and I realised that we have no cheque books at home.

I had assumed the contractor would have a mobile merchant terminal and that by the following day at the latest he would have my cash in his bank, all accounting completed except for the monthly bank reconciliation etc. Nah they cost too much he told me; oblivious to the savings and efficiency they offer.

Sensis 2013 research of SMEs found that the percentage taking orders online rose five percent to 56 per cent, and of those taking orders 59 per cent reported that they mainly sold to customers in the same city or town.

SME’s may now have the equipment and they have demonstrated that they will spend on technology, though few are yet fully mobile, they do not have the knowledge or skills to bring the “whole” together, to integrate and utilize the digital opportunities to build profits and cut costs.

Late in 2013 a client was looking to raise equity to take his “eConsultancy” national we looked at the model which was excellent, looked at the market and then discussed the equity needed with clients. Investors are usually Savvy and the equity was raised on day one which has to tell you something!

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-bd

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

www.wardourcapital.com

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A Great Mind Map - WCP 2014

 

Mind Mapping: let it work for you.

MIND MAPPING

Some of us think better in pictures etc. Before thinking through a big idea, I usually visualise it as a diagram. I have always “solved problems” graphically. Sometimes entirely within my mind and then A1 sheets of paper, followed by whiteboards, and eventually computers. Now I use a combination of all three. I called it mind mapping long before the phrase became popular – it just seemed to fit..

Basically mind mapping is the task of transferring thought and ideas, group or individual into a written form. I find brainstorming sessions are so much more powerful if there is a mind mapper in the group and especially so if that person is good with pen, paper or the whiteboard.

Are you a mind mapper? Are you able to get those amazing business ideas you toy with when driving or in bed down onto paper? It’s a skill but not a hard one to acquire, it can be fun and importantly the results can really change your business.

WHAT IS MIND MAPPING?

A mind map is a powerful way to generate and visualise new ideas, analyse problems, brainstorm, plan, show or research, complex ideas. Isn’t this just good old fashioned “brainstorming” under a new name? I hear you ask. No, mind mapping is a more structured approach to analysing and solving problems.

We now operate in a world where graphic representations are used more frequently and our brains are responding well to graphic analysis. Here are a few handy tools you can use to incorporate mind mapping into your business process.

WHITEBOARDS

The most basic tool you can use for mind mapping is a whiteboard. If you have a whiteboard you can start mind mapping individually or as a team to solve problems or to formulate new ideas. Today life is so easy, when you have the whiteboard full of ideas, take a picture of the whiteboard with your phone and upload it to your computer and share it with the team. Sometimes I get the original whiteboard data on the 60 inch screen in the meeting room so the whole team can see it and we start again on the whiteboard testing out our earlier ideas. This is a great way to mind map as a team.

THE BIGGERPLATE MIND MAP

If you want to up the ante and introduce a little more structure and sophistication into your sessions there are now several free or inexpensive mind mapping programs available.

Biggerplate’s mind map should meet most of your needs. In this extensive mind map collection, you’ll find templates for almost every task and challenge, including business mind maps, training mind maps, and general mind maps which you can use in your everyday life. The Biggerplate templates include everything you need from SWOT analysis (strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats), time management matrix, project management, task management and even tracking objectives.

If you and your team are struggling to get the mind mapping started, the Biggerplate templates can lead you into and through the process. I enjoy looking through Biggerplate’s top 10 mind maps just to see which templates other professionals are finding useful.

MINDJET

Very easy to use and inexpensive to buy Mindjet is an easy to use program designed for a variety of tasks, including mind mapping and brainstorming, Mindjet has flexible features which can be used in a variety of tasks including mind mapping, strategy development, marketing, sales and information technology.

MAPS FOR THAT!

The title just about says it all. Maps for That is great if you’re looking to share the mind maps you have just created or if you want to browse mind maps submitted by other teams or team members. It comes with amazing features and includes user-submitted mind maps in a variety of categories; including business, analysis, management, education, entertainment, events, and productivity, just to name a few.

If you’ve created a mind map you think others may find useful, upload it to the Maps For That site so that other users of the service can share. Initially just sign up for a free account, you can download and upload mind maps, comment on other users’ mind maps, and rate the mind maps you find the most useful.

MOBILE APPS

If your business uses smartphones or tablets as a way to communicate or work on projects, check out the mobile apps available from Mindjet. These apps allow you to create, edit, and view mind maps while you’re on the go or away from your computer. Available for the iPhone, iPad, and Android devices, these mobile apps can be downloaded free of charge directly to your smartphone or tablet.

If you haven’t started using mind mapping in your business, you may be missing out. Mind mapping can be used to create new business ideas, solve complex problems, and brainstorm with other team members — whether you’re in the office or on the go.

As I said at the start we all think and work differently, I enjoy mind mapping, let me know what you think.

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-b8

The Barking Mad Blog

Business Advice with Bite!

www.wardourcapital.com

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Communication 2

The Power of Great Communication

And……..How-to-become-a-great-communicator.

Often after first drafting a speech or an article I look through and ask myself the question “what would my wife cut out of this?” Invariably its 60% or so of what I have written. My wife, I should add, is a successful author, journalist and historian and she can paint amazing mind images with such economy of words.

What I realise is that with discipline I can and do communicate well but I am not a natural. As I commence a story around the family dinner table the “children”, largely grown and successful now, groan and shout “make it quick or we are leaving” or “oh not that one again.”

Whilst not comparing myself (lol) with great communicators such as Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, John F Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, Nelson Mandela and Paul Keating I do occasionally wonder how Sunday lunch went down at their house.

Peggy Noonan was presidential speechwriter for most of Ronald Reagan’s presidency and she explains why Reagan’s presidency had such an impact on the world stage.

“He was often moving, but he was moving not because of the way he said things, he was moving because of what he said. He didn’t say things in a big way; he said big things … Writers, reporters and historians were in a quandary in the Reagan years. ‘The People,’ as they put it, were obviously impressed by much of what Reagan said; this could not be completely dismissed.”

Reagan was known as “The Great Communicator”, yet it’s a nickname he didn’taltogether agree with.  In his farewell address to the nation and to the world, in his own humble way, he redirected the praise by saying:

“In all of that time I won a nickname, ‘The Great Communicator.’ But I never thought it was my style or the words I used that made a difference: It was the content. I wasn’t a great communicator, but I communicated great things, and they didn’t spring full bloom from my brow, they came from the heart of a great nation — from our experience, our wisdom, and our belief in principles that have guided us for two centuries.”

My take on this is that it doesn’t matter whether you are a president or a manager – your success will depend heavily on your communication skill.

What are the key actions of great communicators?

Engagement

Communication is just that, it’s a two way flow of information. Great communicators know how to give and take and understand its importance. They not only initiate conversation, they steer the direction of and encourage others to join in the conversation.

Connection

Great communicators know that people won’t listen unless they connect both intellectually and emotionally. Know your audience and start by conveying emotional stories that connect to their heart. It’s all about the quality of the relationships the leader has with the people they communicate with.

I know several tough and very senior Australian business leaders who have met Bill Clinton on separate occasions both in Australia and in the US, each was impressed. In my post meeting discussions with them each said that when Bill Clinton talks with you, he makes you feel like you are the only person in the world. Wow. Show your listeners your empathy let them feel it and know you value their importance.

Humour

Great communicators are skilled in relaxing those with whom they communicate. An audience is often suspicious or defensive from over-communication and perhaps afraid of being “sold something”.  Great communicators show genuine interest in the other person and use humour and authenticity to come across as understandable and authentic..

Clarification

If you overwhelm your listeners, you will lose them, they will tune you out from boredom or confusion. Reagan was best known for being simple and clear. Never assume just because you understand what you’re saying that your audience does as well. Great communicators find ways to simplify though issues without being condescending.

Reinforcement

Great communicators know that an audience will retain only ten percent of what they hear, and therefore they are skilled at subtly reinforcing key ideas. They re-run their message throughout their presentations, speeches and writings. It is all about context and repetition.

Well I reckon that given the chance “my editor” would have pulled 15% of this and yet I think we are communicating OK!

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-b0

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

www.wardourcapital.com

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Shhhhhhh!

4 Words to Avoid 

 

I have never really believed in New Year’s resolutions. Perhaps because as a child I constantly resolved to behave better the next year only to be involved in further mischief the first day school resumed.

 Move forward many years and I find myself contemplating change and wondering how I can improve myself in 2014.

Along with many others I need to be more positive, to look at the stars again and see just how brimming with opportunity life is and yet without realising it we have a tendency to introduce negatives into our thoughts and everyday conversations and getting rid of some of these negatives is my resolution for 2014.

So what am I proposing?

Really big resolutions always fall by the wayside so let’s consider something smaller; eliminating the use of just four simple, yet negative words, from our everyday vocabulary. Hate, Cannot, Never and Impossible.

These words are rarely used in context, rarely make sense and rarely if ever contribute to anything positive.

Let’s look at the words individually and see what we think:

HATE: “A transitive verb; to dislike somebody or something intensely, often in a way that evokes feelings of anger, hostility, or animosity”

Now this is a very strong, negative and unpleasant word and one I would like to see disappear from use. If you are like me you probably don’t actually hate anything and yet this word creeps insidiously into conversation…”oh I hate the idea”…..”oh I hate Social Media”, “I hate this project”.  Do you really?

Interestingly when reading or listening to stories of Holocaust or Kokoda Trail survivors they had most often realised that to survive and move on with life it was important not to hate their captors.

Most great achievements in history have followed periods of struggle and complexity and I am sure that at times Pythagoras was frustrated by his formulae but did he hate them?

Let’s change our thinking to “not sure I am in love with the idea but let’s think it through” or “I just don’t get Social Media!!”

We have still let our feelings show through but in a positive way.

CANNOT: “a model verb used to indicate that it is impossible for something to be done or made use of in a particular way

In our everyday lives is there really anything that we cannot do? Accepting that we must abide by society’s rules, we are then able to do pretty much anything we put our minds to.

When you are next tempted to say “I cannot get this report finished in time” or “I cannot get to the gym today”, think of the Para-Olympics and the CAN-DO attitude in use and on display each and every day to do what many would say “Cannot” be done.

So often cannot is used where “don’t want to” or “it will be hard” should be used.

Let’s become a can do person. Let’s consider the task and look at the different ways it can be approached and remember. You CAN do it, you WILL do it and soon you HAVE done it!!

NEVER: “an adverb indicating that something will not happen at any time, or that somebody will definitely not do something.”

Never is not so aggressively negative and yet in real terms what does it mean? I always see never as never really arriving and therefore non-existent, but it slides quietly, and negatively into our conversations….”that will never work”….”we never do it that way”…….”she will never work out/fit in etc”.

What does this mean?

Just by saying never we are limiting our possibilities. We may for whatever reason not be able to do something this minute or this day but who knows what tomorrow or next week will bring.

Perhaps we should be thinking “how is that going to work?”……”can we do this another way”…..”how can we help her fit in”

Interestingly never can be turned around…..”I will never rest until I achieve this” but that’s a different story!

IMPOSSIBLE: “not able to exist or be done”

We never know what is “possible” until we really try. Quite often we achieve the “impossible” just because we didn’t know it was “impossible”…..yes think on that!

Imagine waking up from an accident to hear the surgeon say you will never walk again or never talk again. This is a situation faced by accident and stroke victims around the world and yet against all medical evidence people move forward and do the “impossible” they walk again, they talk again!

Let’s think of these people and take our lead from them, yes the task is tough, we don’t know how but we do know we can do it!

Every day in large and small ways someone, somewhere does “the impossible” and that is one of the enduring features of being human and being successful.

So you know what I am up to in 2014

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-aO

 

Wardour Capital Meeting #2  2014

10 Tips to Organize a Successful Business Meet

What do you do to ensure that the business meet you organized doesn’t fizzle out?

As a top entrepreneur in the lead, you must take the initiative to arrange business meets to connect with others. But that isn’t all; you need to create an event that people enjoy. Not something they dread!

If you create a platform where entrepreneurs share their thoughts, views, opinions and crises. It helps you earn the trust and respect of your fellow entrepreneurs. And it boosts that collegiate  feeling. You just need to make it a success. But it is easier said than done.

Let’s take a look at 10 simple but effective things that can help you achieve your goal.

Take Your Time to Plan Every Detail

You cannot wait until the last minute to send out the invites and think everyone will turn up. Decide the time and date, select the venue and inform the business meet group members about it in advance. They have to fit it into their busy schedules too.

Check Every Important Aspect In Advance

How will you feel if the audio doesn’t work when someone’s making a presentation? Reach the venue and double check every detail. Make sure the space is adequate for all and the audio-visual equipment works.

Make It An Exclusive Event

Identify the niche you are in and create a group with a strong focus on the core concept. When you make it an invite-only event, you generate interest about it among the entrepreneurs in the niche to participate. This also encourages the aspirants to be part of the community.

Make Introductions Easy With Name Tags

It isn’t easy to remember the names of hundreds of entrepreneurs at an event. Create name tags. It will make introductions a breeze! You can also add their business name and relevant details to it.

Adhere To Your Goals to Meet Expectations

As an organizer, you need to have a clear idea about what the meet is all about. Make sure this is in keeping with the image of your business. For example, if you are into apps development for educational institutes, educational meets are more suited. Plan the meet according to the purpose.

Organize Topics to Keep Everyone Engaged

What do you want people to talk about? Decide the things you want to interest people in at the meet. Use the topics to initiate conversations. You can also throw in some challenges to keep things in motion.

Offer Exposure for Start-ups

You may also incorporate talks, events, quizzes and such other elements into the business meet. But when you let a start-up offer a demo at the meet, you add to its interest. It supplies food for thought for the entrepreneurs present and gives them an excellent topic of discussion.

Give Conversations a Direction

Don’t let the conversation die down. Place your contacts at opportune points to keep it going. With this simple tactic, you will create an environment where people learn new things without a hitch.

Foster Relationships

A business meet is all about the relations entrepreneurs create. And the community they build. It is possible to boost entrepreneurial efforts when people have the support of their peers. Don’t just keep it professional. Let entrepreneurs connect with each other on a personal level. Social hangouts can help you with this.

Keep It Confidential

No entrepreneur will open up unless they are sure that their secret’s safe with the attendees. This is possible only when you assure that it remains within the group. Open and frank discussions will be possible only if you do this.

It isn’t difficult if you are aware of how to keep things in motion at the meet.

With a little planning and effort, it is possible to organize a business meet where the group members can share their stories, offer others positive challenges, help others get back on track and create a strong community.

 And what do you get out of it? Well, you become the proud organizer of a business meet that isn’t another monotonous hour of long conversations between people who don’t even connect with each other. But something that gives everyone their fair share of exposure in the community and ample food for thought.

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-az

 

Teamwork

A STRONG TEAM

IS

VITAL TO SUCCESS

Early in my career it was noted that “I didn’t suffer fools gladly”. At the time I took it as a compliment as I couldn’t understand why some of the people in the organisation just couldn’t grasp the problem, yet alone see the solution and fix it. Clearly they were fools!

As I travelled around the organisation from city to city reviewing performance I was unbeknown to me leaving a trail of emotional disaster and disharmony. One day the CEO sat down in my office and declared that if he could lock me in that room, push problems under the door and wait for me to push the solutions back out some time later, we could change the world. Yes this was the pre computer age and I had to change.

Whilst I had grasped problem solving I had little idea of or interest in the team. I was just so absorbed with problems and their solutions.

I am now much better, though still not good, at team work but I have recognised that a good team is both high performing and exciting to work in. Results flow from great teams.

Cerebral loneliness is a very real problem, I need the companionship of strong thinkers to challenge and spark my own mind. Brilliant ideas are rarely born in isolation, and successful projects stem from a strong, collective team. Without the spark of companionable challenge I find I can become almost self-destructive in my thinking.

In other words, to do great work, you must surround yourself with great people.

It’s an interesting exercise to define what this means for the type of thinkers you want on your team. I find that my best work comes from interaction with people who think differently than I do – and differently from each other. A diversity of mental profiles yields the richest results. Here are six personality types I would have on my dream team.

1. The dreamer: This person never ceases imagining what’s not, what’s next and what’s possible. They think big and hopefully, stretching the bounds of what is considered achievable. They never stop asking, “what if?’ and supply your team with an electric and optimistic creative energy.

2. The debater: Debaters question your assumptions, call out your leap of faith logic and point out the flaws in the plan. They see problems long before others, and they keep everyone grounded and prepared. Their questioning nature forces you to strengthen the rigor of your arguments.

3. The disruptor: The disruptor challenges the status quo and breaks others out of their mental ruts and insular perspective by bringing fresh and far-ranging perspective. My favourite disruptors are intellectually curious, lateral thinkers who are first to spot latent competitors and untapped opportunities in the market.

4. The driver: Drivers are natural leaders, bringing a crusading, concentrated vision to all work and supplying forward momentum when everyone else is losing steam or motivation. They are positively relentless in pursuing an idea, galvanizing political support for it and keeping it on track. They can be fantastic advocates for the customer, and at times hard drivers keeping the team focused on the problem you’re here to solve.

5. The detailer: This type digs into every facet of a project. Detailers focus on practicalities and save everyone else from silly mistakes and fatal design flaws because they think through all the angles and implications. They identify what’s missing in even the best-laid plans and can diagnose the precise point when something could break or be improved.

6. The doer: The doer is the wonderfully resourceful team member who gets stuff done, no matter what. Doers roll up their sleeves and find the practical solutions to delivering products services and “what-nots” on time and on budget. They are great colleagues to those who devise the grand strategy because they get it delivered on time, all the time.

Do you recognise your team members here or see gaps in your own team? Do you think of attributes that I may have missed. Let me know or post your comments below.

Neil Steggall

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with bite!

http://wp.me/p401Wv-7N

www.wardourcapital.com

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October 22, 2013

The Perfect Storm

(A Modern Horror Story)

Because it Rains in Paradise

Why be so negative?……. well let’s use  Paradise as a metaphor.

Because It Rains in Paradise…….!!!!!! 

Come along take a short ride on this little thought wave, let’s see Paradise as a metaphor for a well-run business, a prosperous and growing concern and let’s see the rain as a metaphor for an approaching economic storm.

How well protected are we in terms of our ability to weather the storm? We have our business plans to hand but they make no mention of a storm. Have you been through a storm before? What changes? How do we survive? How bad will be storm be? Can we rebuild post storm?

So many questions and yet so far so few real life answers.

Breath deeply, let us relax together and read a little story……….

At times business can appear a lot like paradise, it’s a great place to be, and everyone wants to be there to enjoy life with you, to know you and to bask in your reflected success. You are the visionary, the hard working, creative, entrepreneurial brain who made this all possible, your adrenaline flows, your energy and ideas come together, your staff are happy, motivated and successful, they respect you, the cash flows in, you drive a nice car, dress well, you eat at the best restaurants, you fly at the front of the plane, you speak at conferences, and…….ahhhh you sit back, relax and you reflect on just how good your life is.

One day, a small cloud passes between you and the sun, sending a slight shiver through you, but it quickly passes. Utilizing your latest smart devices you send a few more ideas, instructions, queries, emails and more pictures of Paradise to your office, you check your bank balances, transfer a few funds here and there and it’s not yet lunch time.

The sun still shines but the palm leaves rustle again this time with an unsettling sound and in the distance the ocean appears darker, are those clouds, building in the far distance or a trick of light on the horizon?

Far, far away from Paradise and way over the horizon is The Land of Plunder (LOP). A terrible, bleak, dark miserable environment that draws the humanity, skill, resourcefulness and entrepreneurial spirit out of you like a black hole draws energy from its surrounding universe…..no profit, not even a scrap, ever escapes its clutches.

Populated almost entirely by wise and educated sages such as investment bankers, credit providers, speculators, derivative traders, stock brokers, securitization specialists, short sellers, long sellers, fund managers, promoters, actuaries, lenders, accountants, auditors, receivers, managers, liquidators, lawyers, barristers, regulators, and their shiny suited minions oh it’s a soulless place to exist yet alone to live.

The problem is that in the Land of Plunder no one actually makes, grows, manufactures, produces or sells anything. Nothing. Not a single thingamajig or even a widget. Not a single truly commercial activity in the whole land. Yet its population consumes the funds made in Paradise, it lives to play games with those funds converting them into concepts and instruments called spreads, market sectors, cash, gold, minerals, fuel, pork bellies, red bean futures, long and short positions, options, shares, derivatives, differentials, margins, rates of interest, rates of exchange, incremental ROI, leveraged positions, contingent assets and equally contingent liabilities. Perhaps the favourite game of all, played only by the most knowledgeable of sages, is the interpretation and discussion of meanings…..net, gross, before, after, on or off the balance sheet, earnings brought forward, deferred debt, provision for, contingent, or not and most importantly the holy grail itself………THE BONUS.

That night as you lay back in your king size bed, sipping a final glass of Comte de Taittinger, the wind rises and the palm leaves rustle, indeed as the tree trunks bend under the increasing force of the wind you get to thinking about The Land of Plunder. Who actually pays them and what for? What happens historically? Doesn’t the LOP like totally fuck up at least once every generation? And what happens when they do? Could it damage your business? What could you do to protect your business and the thousands like yours?

Another perfect day in Paradise dawns and already your CFO has confirmed that your cash registers are still singing caa-ching, your revenues are up, your staff are motivated, your customers are happy, your suppliers are on time and on budget and your R&D team is about to make yet another technological breakthrough and yet that lingering fear niggles away at you. How would I get by if the LOP was to get it all wrong?

Much of your new day is given over to this dreadful thought, and with the help of your laptop you reflect on history’s greatest LOP fuck ups. Dating from the Roman Emperor Diocletian’s disaster in the fourth century to those wicked Medici’s and their Pazzi Conspiracy and the subsequent Banking collapse of the fifteenth century, to the collapse of the Spanish economy in the mid sixteenth century….oh how could the wise sages have got the gold price so wrong? Of course no one within the LOP’s Dutch branch could have imagined that one day a Tulip Bulb would be worth less than its weight in gold but alas it came about. All of this further distresses you.

You of course realise that in the eighteenth century the sages came up with a brilliant plan, they sold the South Seas Company the exclusive rights to trade with and to import gold and other untold riches from South America. Sadly the sages didn’t actually clear this with the owners of South America, (Spain) or even mention it in the prospectus, small oversights they later realised and thus came about the South Sea Bubble. To date this is still history’s largest corporate collapse. Those damned Spaniards just didn’t play Cricket, did they, the sages were heard to mumble.

Racing forward, you find we have the sages of the LOP, engineering a convenient double act, in the Railroad and Silver collapse in nineteenth century America. Again the sages were ever so slightly wrong. More rail road carriages and rail roads were built than there were people and stock to travel on them. Some railroads went to towns and cities yet to be built. Proving that a double act was possible, the sages funded one or two, or was it ten or twenty, US silver mines to be opened on virtually the same day and surprise, surprise, the silver price fell through the floor. The US economy plunged into recession, jobs lost, families homeless, Railroad stocks crashed and companies failed but God Bless the sages……they still had their fees.

Still good hardworking entrepreneurs just like you were soon back at work in Paradise building their businesses, making and selling thingummy bits, widgets and the many whatnots needed by the people of Paradise. The sages were so impressed they decided to buy shares in these solid enterprises and trade them at a profit in LOP, whilst of course charging fees and profitably clipping tickets along the way.

Alas the shares were oversold and overpriced and in 1929 the entire global monetary system collapsed causing the worst depression, loss of jobs, homelessness, self-respect and starvation the world has ever known. In fairness some of the sages did feel quite bad about this and threw themselves out of their Towers of Babel to the pavement below. Though not many; and for the few that fell it was often as close to reality and real people as they ever came. One could go on and on mentioning the sages doing so well out of the provision of two glorious sessions of twentieth century global war debt, the Credit Squeeze of the early ’70s, the stock market collapse of 1987, the Banking Crisis of the early 1990’s and that monumental fuck up of 2008, but by now you really need a drink;

More importantly you need to recognise a the pattern, call in some real people and plan!

Please lets us know your thoughts, ideas and feedback. Contribute to this debate is both free and important to do so!

Post your thoughts below and………………….give some bark to your thinking!!!

October 2013

Neil Steggall

http://wp.me/p401Wv-aS

The Barking Mad Blog

SME Advice with Bite!